Is Pay-Per-Use for Broadband Inevitable?

Two decades ago Tim Berners-Lee invented the browser, HTML, and the web, but things took off six years later when America Online switched from pay-by-the minute dial-up to unlimited flat-rate plans, causing usage per sub to more than triple. But pay-per use is coming back.…

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Can Usage-based Broadband Billing Be Done Fairly?

The debate over the implementation of usage-based billing frameworks (so-called “metered billing”) for broadband services is far from over, but some execs view it as inevitable. If that is indeed the case, what would be a fair construct? Or is it even possible to be fair?…

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GigaOM White Paper: The Facts & Fiction of Bandwidth Caps

Beginning on Wednesday, Comcast is going to start capping the total amount of data you can transfer using their broadband connection, to 250GB per month. In order to give you a better understanding of the issues at hand, I have teamed up with my old friend Muayyad Al-Chalabi to release this white paper, "Broadband Usage-Based Pricing and Caps Analysis."…

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Yo FCC! Are You Doing Anything About Metered Broadband?

FCC Chairman Kevin Martin has recently taken up a populist and politically lucrative crusade against Comcast and its nefarious efforts to block certain kinds of traffic. But this is nothing more than a diversionary tactic, one aimed at taking attention away from the service providers' implementation of metered broadband.…

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Why Metered Broadband Is Bad for Microsoft, Google & Us

The usage-based pricing plans being considered by AT&T, Time Warner and others will force us all to wonder about the size of our connectivity bill on a monthly basis. Which means it won't only be bad for users, but for some of the Internet service providers' largest customers.…

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Why Tiered Broadband Is the Enemy of Innovation

Like it or not, the reality is that broadband is becoming an alternate video network, and the video traffic is going to keep increasing, putting the entire business model of cable companies at risk. By responding with bandwidth caps, however, they are trying to put the genie back in the broadband bottle, which in turn risks the entire innovation ecosystem. Continue Reading

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