Sports report: Conflict ahead

As sports viewing increasingly goes over-the-top and mobile, taking the traditional broadcast audience with it, big-ticket, broadcast-only rights deals are going to grow increasingly problematic for the broadcasters.…

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Google-NFL: Head fake, or real deal?

Putting "NFL Sunday Ticket" on YouTube wouldn't really do much for Google's broader OTT ambitions. YouTube, by design, is an open, non-exclusive platform available around the world to anyone with internet access; putting "Sunday Ticket" there would actually undermine Google's efforts to sell a bundled package of channels for its virtual pay-TV service.…

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Bundles of joy

A report released by Needham & Co. senior entertainment and internet analyst Laura Martin argues not only that the current, multichannel pay-TV bundle is a good deal for consumers but that eliminating it by offering channels ala carte would be catastrophic for the TV ecosystem.…

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Spoil sports: The coming showdown over TV sports

Over the last 20 months, national networks have agreed to spend $72 billion over the next decade for TV rights to professional and college sports, the Olympics, and other major sporting events, according to a study published by the Philadelphia Inquirer. Add in the commitments for local broadcast rights made by regional sports networks such as YES in New York and the total probably exceeds $100 billion.…

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