Reddit

More cash flows toward parking startups: ParkWhiz raises $2M

Last week SpotHero announced a $2.5 million round. This week competitor and fellow Chicago parking outfit ParkWhiz announced its Series A. ParkWhiz started out selling parking spaces online for special events like the Super Bowl, but it’s expanded into day-to-day spot reservations.

Reddit, freedom of speech and the dark side of community

In addition to occasional acts of journalism, Reddit is also known for its less savory content, including a page featuring creepy photos of women taken without their permission — and the controversy over that kind of content says a lot about the nature of the community.

Can you gamify content curation? This startup thinks so

Can a virtual stock exchange for content curation, combined with Reddit-style voting, lead to better online video discovery? Turkey-based media curation startup Woisio thinks so, and it is trying to prove its theory with a private beta test of its new platform.

Why it’s better for fact-checking to be done in public

Critics of a Newsweek cover story by historian Niall Ferguson say the piece should never have been published because of the errors and flawed logic it contains. But isn’t it better if those kinds of mistakes are corrected in public view instead of behind closed doors?

The Colorado shooting and the crowdsourced future of news

The way that communities like Reddit can come together to produce real-time reporting on incidents like the mass shooting in a Colorado movie theater shows how a new form of journalism — one that blends traditional reporting and crowdsourced reports — is starting to take shape.

Twitter, Reddit and the newsroom of the future

Comparing a traditional news story about a recent shooting with a news report from a Reddit user — who pulled together Twitter messages from the perpetrators and victims — provides a glimpse of what a real-time, crowdsourced newsroom of the future might look like.

Isolationist no more: The Internet goes to Washington

The launch of a think tank to educate Congress about disruptive technologies is just one of several new efforts proposed by the Internet and startup community. Conversations between Silicon Valley and D.C. will no longer rely on big tech firms. The Internet can disrupt politics too,

Twitter and Reddit as crowdsourced fact-checking engines

New research about how news is verified through Twitter and a crowdsourced debunking of some fake Wikipedia entries reinforce the point that social networks and online communities can be powerful tools for the real-time verification of events, something that used to take place behind closed doors.

Could crowdsourcing be a better way to make legislation?

In an attempt to come up with better laws on copyright, Reddit is crowdsourcing the creation of a Free Internet Act, while Public Knowledge is trying to introduce its own alternatives. But will crowdsourcing work, or will it just add to the chaos and confusion?

New York protest takes PIPA/SOPA fight to senators

Members of New York’s tech community, a couple thousand strong, braved the winter chill and gathered outside the offices of New York senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand to protest the PIPA and SOPA legislation Wednesday, calling it a potentially crippling set of bills.

Taking SOPA/PIPA to the streets: Protests on for SF, NYC

The anti-SOPA and PIPA demonstrations don’t stop with site-wide blackouts planned for Wednesday by a number of web giants. People also have plans to meet up in real life and take the protest to the streets in cities such as San Francisco, New York and Seattle.

Reasons why the social graph deserves to die

In a smart essay on the technical origins of today’s social networks, Pinboard founder Maciej Ceglowski explores the idea of why the social graph doesn’t work in the way we need — and explodes it in the process.

The Daily Dot: Interesting idea, but not a great metaphor

The Daily Dot wants to be the “hometown newspaper for the Internet,” but how many of its stories about Reddit photos or YouTube videos will be of interest to anyone outside of those communities? And does the newspaper metaphor make any sense for an online-publishing venture?

What Reddit says about the expanding idea of journalism

Can we find clues about the future of news and journalism in the way a link-sharing site like Reddit operates? We just might be able to — and it’s a good reminder that the replacement for mainstream news media may look very different from what we expect.

Netflix hires Reddit Chief Architect: Will outages end?

Former Reddit Chief Architect Jeremy Edberg will be joining Netflix to lead a new team focused on cloud reliability. And the move couldn’t come soon enough, as Netflix suffered another period of downtime Sunday evening that left users with spotty service for up to eight hours.

Share and Share Alike: BBC iPlayer Gets More Social

The BBC is adding new ways for iPlayer viewers to share what they’re watching with their friends and social networks, with a new share button. In addition to standard networks like Facebook and Twitter, iPlayer users can now send videos to Delicious, Digg, Reddit and StumbleUpon.

What Amazon and Its Customers Must Learn From Last Week’s Outage

Opinion on Amazon Web Services recent outage remains somewhat divided: One side blames Amazon for its technical failings; the other holds the cloud giant’s customers responsible for their bad judgment. But the answer to where the primary responsibility lies is a little less black and white.

CollegeHumor’s Sam Reich Spills Secrets to Success

Last night, CollegeHumor President of Original Content Sam Reich spent his flight from NY to LA taking questions from Reddit, along the way revealing the site’s writing process, plans for follow-up videos, which traffic day is the worst, and what happened to the CollegeHumor grunt.

Digg Users Are Revolting — But Literally This Time

After a problem-plagued relaunch at Digg, thousands of users have been registering their displeasure with the new version of the site by voting up links from Digg competitor Reddit. By noon on Monday, nine out of the top 10 links on Digg were submitted from Reddit.

Thoof Goes Poof; So Does Mercora/Social.FM

Sorry, couldn’t resist it…Thoof, the social news ranking site formed last year and which had $1 million in funding from Austin Ventures an…

Reddit Users Get Their Own TV Show

PBS is partnering with social news service Reddit to pilot a television series called YourWeek that combines user-submitted video segments and in-studio…

A list of Long Tail b-models

WIRED Editor Chris Anderson, who is also author of the best-selling book, The Long Tail, recently published a blog post listing various…