Voices in AI – Episode 29: A Conversation with Hugo LaRochelle

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In this episode, Byron and Hugo discuss consciousness, machine learning and more.

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Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI, brought to you by Gigaom. I’m Byron Reese. Today I’m excited; our guest is Hugo Larochelle. He is a research scientist over at Google Brain. That would be enough to say about him to start with, but there’s a whole lot more we can go into. He’s an Associate Professor, on leave presently. He’s an expert on machine learning, and he specializes in deep neural networks in the areas of computer vision and natural language processing. Welcome to the show, Hugo.

Hugo Larochelle: Hi. Thanks for having me.

I’m going to ask you only one, kind of, lead-in question, and then let’s dive in. Would you give people a quick overview, a hierarchical explanation of the various terms that I just used in there? In terms of, what is “machine learning,” and then what are “neural nets” specifically as a subset of that? And what is “deep learning” in relation to that? Can you put all of that into perspective for the listener?

Sure, let me try that. Machine learning is the field in computer science, and in AI, where we are interested in designing algorithms or procedures that allow machines to learn. And this is motivated by the fact that we would like machines to be able to accumulate knowledge in an automatic way, as opposed to another approach which is to just hand-code knowledge into a machine. That’s machine learning, and there are a variety of different approaches for allowing for a machine to learn about the world, to learn about achieving certain tasks.

Within machine learning, there is one approach that is based on artificial neural networks. That approach is more closely inspired from our brains, from real neural networks and real neurons. It is still somewhat vaguely inspired by—in the sense that many of these algorithms probably aren’t close to what real biological neurons are doing—but some of the inspiration for it, I guess, is a lot of people in machine learning, and specifically in deep learning, have this perspective that the brain is really a biological machine. That it is executing some algorithm, and would like to discover what this algorithm is. And so, we try to take inspiration from the way the brain functions in designing our own artificial neural networks, but also take into account how machines work and how they’re different from biological neurons.

There’s the fundamental unit of computation in artificial neural networks, which is this artificial neuron. You can think of it, for instance, that we have neurons that are connected to our retina. And so, on a machine, we’d have a neuron that would be connected to, and take as input, the pixel values of some image on a computer. And in artificial neural networks, for the longest of time, we would have such neural networks with mostly a single layer of these neurons—so multiple neurons trying to detect different patterns in, say, images—and that was the most sophisticated type of artificial neural networks that we could really train with success, say ten years ago or more, with some exceptions. But in the past ten years or so, there’s been development in designing learning algorithms that leverage so called deep neural networks that have many more of these layers of neurons. Much like, in our brain we have a variety of brain regions that are connected with one another. How the light, say, flows in our visual cortex, it flows from the retina to various regions in the visceral cortex. In the past ten years there’s been a lot of success in designing more and more successful learning algorithms that are based on these artificial neural networks with many layers of artificial neurons. And that’s been something I’ve been doing research on for the past ten years now.

You just touched on something interesting, which is this parallel between biology and human intelligence. The human genome is like 725MB, but so much of it we share with plants and other life on this planet. If you look at the part that’s uniquely human, it’s probably 10MB or something. Does that imply to you that you can actually create an AGI, an artificial general intelligence, with as little as 10MB of code if we just knew what that 10MB would look like? Or more precisely, with 10MB of code could you create something that could in turn learn to become an AGI?

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