Docker buys SocketPlane as it builds out its container-networking strategy

1 Comment

You can add another acquisition to Docker’s plate with the startup set to announce on Wednesday that it has bought a small networking startup called SocketPlane. The acquisition, whose financial terms were not disclosed, is just one more step in Docker’s plans to become the de-facto container-management company whose technology can play well on multiple infrastructures.

SocketPlane’s entire six-person staff is joining Docker and will be helping the container-centric startup develop a networking API that makes it possible to string together hundreds to thousands of containers together no matter if the containers “reside in different data centers,” explained Scott Johnston, Docker’s SVP of product.

The upcoming networking API can be thought of as an extension to Docker’s recently announced orchestration services. Although the new orchestration services makes it possible to spin up and manage multiple clusters of containers, the current Docker networking technology built into the platform only works well for “a handful of hosts and containers” as opposed to the thousands needed in complex environments like Spotify’s infrastructure, explained Johnston.

In order for Docker’s orchestration services to really come to fruition and deliver on the promise of spinning up and managing tons of containers, Docker requires an underlying networking API that enables all of those containers to speak to each other at a massive scale. Docker decided that it needed this technology expertise in-house, so it turned to SocketPlane, whose staff includes networking veterans from [company]Cisco[/company], OpenStack and OpenDaylight, said Johnston.

The goal is to create a networking API that can work with the gear and applications from providers like VMware/Nicira as well as Cisco and [company]Juniper[/company], explained Johnston. Theoretically, the API will make it possible for a user to build a distributed, containerized application in one data center that uses Cisco networking gear and have that application move over to an OpenStack-based cloud environment that uses Juniper gear “without breaking everything,” said Johnston.

If VMware has its own networking technology that users like, users should be able to “swap out” the Docker networking technology and use the other technology, said Johnston. Google’s own Kubernetes container orchestration system currently swaps out the existing Docker networking technology for its own networking technology, said Johnston, but once the SocketPlane team builds a workable open networking API, you can imagine a world in which users can alternate between Kubernetes or Docker’s Swarm orchestration service if they choose to.

“Say this works and we have ten or twelve implementations of the API,” said Johnston. “A network operator might want to take advantage of that.”

This makes for Docker’s third publicly-known acquisition. The startup bought devops startup Koality last October, which was preceded by the July acquisition of London-based Orchard Laboratories.

Story clarified to emphasize that the APIs will not be swapped out.

1 Comment

ewalsh5

For distributed data center units, migrating to an easy container based dev structure leveraging Docker could be a great way forward for integrated development and architectural growth – bit.ly/18KwOGp. Even in OpenStack summit last November, they scored heavily and sat pretty right behind them. More power to innovation, with Socketplane. – Eamon Walsh, commenting on behalf of IDG and Red Hat

Comments are closed.