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You unlock this smartphone with your eyes

Some of the new phones launching at Mobile World Congress are sporting fingerprint scanners, but a new device from ZTE uses a very different biometric security measure to lock its screen. Using technology from Kansas City-based EyeVerify, the ZTE Grand S3 uses its front facing camera to check you are who you say you are, based on your baby blues.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sUKEn2UNY5k

EyeVerify’s technology uses an ordinary front-facing camera — its only requirement is that it takes photos at least one megapixel large. Instead of looking at your retinas, EyeVerify authenticates users by looking at vein patterns formed by blood vessels in the whites of the eye. ZTE calls its implementation Eyeprint ID, and it will come to other devices in its high end “Grand” line of smartphones. Android Central was able to try the ZTE Grand S3, and its eye-based unlocking software even works if you wear glasses:

One major question is what EyeVerify does better than fingerprint scanners, which have become the de facto biometric security measure for smartphones.

EyeVerify CEO Toby Rush wrote a blog post earlier this month comparing the two approaches. One of EyeVerify’s largest advantages is that it doesn’t require new hardware. Fingerprint scanners are expensive, and according to Rush, users have to look at their phone ever time it is unlocked, making eye-based verification preferable. However, he admits, in the burgeoning payments market, a fingerprint scanner makes more sense. Imagine standing at a retailer and staring at your phone to confirm your identity.

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The fact that EyeVerify doesn’t require specific hardware means it could also work well for security on cross-platform apps. Banks and credit unions are looking into EyeVerify as a way to lock down their mobile apps.

Other specs on the ZTE Grand S3 include an 8 megapixel front camera, a 16 megapixel rear camera, and a 5.5-inch 1080p display. The phone is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 processor. It’s running Android 4.4.

The ZTE Grand S3 is already in sale in China for a very pricey 2999 RMB ($477) and the company hasn’t mentioned whether it’s bringing the device to markets outside of China. Although ZTE isn’t a household name in the United States, it currently has about six percent of the United States smartphone market, mostly in the low-end. Recently, it’s been trying to raise its profile by sponsoring NBA teams like the Golden State Warriors and New York Knicks.

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3 Responses to “You unlock this smartphone with your eyes”

  1. ewalsh5

    Another biometric gimmick .. it has already been proven that finerprinting and retina scans are passe’ – there are labs close to delivering EMM solutions and BYOD devices for next-gen IoT wearables governed by cardiac rhythm, which is truly unique. Besides, there is the entire aspect of developing apps which can truly be integration at service layer and developed with iterations without having to worry about security of data interfacing and synching. Take a look at Kony’s suite ( bit.ly/1LdzgCV ) for example.

    • ewalsh5

      There’s plenty of cross platform challenges to surmount, from talent crunch to network speed, MBaaS, analytics, to target consolidation in IoT space by vendors. Adding out of data security aspects isn’t the best marketing idea smartphones can use. bit.ly/1CJh8ds – Eamon Walsh, commenting on behalf of IDG and Kony