Kubernetes comes to OpenStack this time thanks to Mirantis

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Credit: David Meyer

For businesses wanting to run the Kubernetes cluster management framework for containers on OpenStack clouds, Google and Mirantis have teamed up to make that happen more easily.

The OpenStack Murano application catalog technology promises to ease deployment of Kubernetes clusters on OpenStack and then deploy Docker containers on those clusters.

Murano provides what Mirantis CEO Adrian Ionel (pictured above) described as a “seamless point-and-click experience” not only for deploying workloads to OpenStack, but also making sure they get there with associated automation, provisioning and security intact. “In this case we use it to automate the provisioning and life cycle management of containers,” he said.

Murano, he added, makes it easier for people to build application environments that can be container-only, or mix containers with bare metal and virtual machines in one big happy package. (I’m paraphrasing here.)

This is not the industry’s first attempt to bring Kubernetes technology, open sourced by Google last year, over to OpenStack. In August, [company] Hewlett-Packard[/company] announced its own Kubernetes setup utility for HP’s OpenStack-based Helion cloud, but I haven’t heard much about it since.

There is no exclusivity in this latest news. The work Mirantis and [company]Google[/company] have done here will, in theory, help customers deploy Kubernetes on any OpenStack distribution. Mirantis and Google will demonstrate the technology Thursday in San Francisco.

And in the grand scheme of things, nearly every cloud or wanna-be cloud vendor worth its salt (including SaltStack) Microsoft, IBM, Red Hat and others, have pledged or contributed actual support for Kubernetes.

This latest news is another indication that Google is indeed serious about providing cloud capabilities to business customers, many of whom still view public clouds like Google Cloud Platform with suspicion. OpenStack is the cloud framework usually mentioned when a company decides to deploy a private cloud that they deem more suited for mission-critical workloads.

“From a Google perspective, containerization is important and running container clusters is a great way to enable developers to be productive,” said Kit Merker, the Google product manager focusing on Google Container Engine and Kubernetes.

“We know that enterprises will take time to transition to cloud. Kubernetes is a way to optimize infrastructure so it can run workloads in private or public cloud or bare metal.”

kubernetes openstackSo this is about workload portability but not really hybrid cloud per se. “This means you can build an application that uses containers and then move it to a different environment. That is what Kubernetes is all about,” he said. That is not the same thing as seamlessly integrating public and private clouds into a hybrid scenario.

AWS

This step by Google, along with other moves announced in the fall and more recent news that it’s bringing four Google services to VMware’s  vCloud Air, are meant to reassure the C-suite set that Google means business.

Note: This story was updated at 11:11 a.m. PST with a more complete list of Kubernetes contributors.

 

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David Mytton

I think this should be considered much more related to the VMWare partnership – the common link is providing tools that work across hybrid environments. Google’s end goal is to get everyone into their cloud but this takes time, so for now they’re helping with tools and integrations to get you into their toolset or start using some of their products.

Then later, that’s when they’ll benefit – from you moving more and more workloads over to services you’re familiar with, and tools you’re already using.

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