Cloud monitoring category gets busier

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Credit: Solarwinds

Server monitoring gets hot

SolarWinds, which monitors multi-vendor technologies running in house, last week bought Librato to extend its reach into the cloud. Librato is noted for its ability to watch workloads running in Heroku and Amazon Web Services as well is in internally-run Rails, Node.js, Ruby, Rails and Java applications.

Austin, Texas-based SolarWinds is betting that, despite the hype, most companies will not move everything to a public cloud or a SaaS vendor but will want ways to monitor workloads whether they are running in the server room down the hall, in AWS US-East or wherever.

For the $40 million purchase price SolarWinds “gets a way to bridge on-prem and cloud worlds and provide visibility across both,” Kevin Thompson, Solarwinds president, (pictured above) said in an interview.

The goal is to give “IT and devops pros a way to manage everything from on-prem to cloud and everything in between or we can’t guarantee a level of performance,” he said.

That’s a tall order. But it’s also a potentially huge market as it’s increasingly clear that most big tech buyers will continue to spread their bets between private and public resources.

It started down this road to cloud by purchasing Pingdom, a website and application monitoring company, in June. Librato is more about monitoring infrastructure at all layers in cloud environments, according to SolarWinds.

There’s been a flurry of activity in server monitoring over the past year. In May, Google purchased StackDriver, which provided monitoring tools for AWS and Google Cloud Platform. Three months later Idera bought Copperegg, another server monitoring product.

Investors are paying attention. Last week another server monitoring entry, Datadog, snagged $31 million in new funding bringing its total funding to more than $50 million. Other entries in this space include Boundary and Server Density.

What’s that again? Amazon to break out its cloud numbers?

But the really big news in cloud last week was all about AWS accounting. [company]Amazon[/company] always talks about how transparent it is. And yet,  the size of its clearly huge AWS business was treated like a state secret, hidden inside another category — which also includes sales of various and sundry other stuff including co-branded credit cards.  That left pundits to guestimate its size. (My favorite anecdote is when an Amazon employee complained to me about [company]Microsoft[/company] being opaque in claiming Azure was a $1 billion business a few years back. FWIW, I agreed that the Azure number was fuzzy at best, but oh the irony that Amazon, of all companies would complain about that.

Sooo, when, on the Q4 earnings call Thursday,  Amazon’s CFO said the company would at last break out AWS numbers, starting this quarter, I had to triple check the news. Make no mistake, this is a big deal, but the break out of cloud numbers won’t necessarily illuminate all mysteries. But baby steps, people.

The down side? Our nifty “Amazon North America Net Sales (other)” chart now can be retired. So here it is one more time (along with associated growth chart.)

Structure Show! All about data!

Check out this week’s Structure Show as data nerd Derrick Harris talks to data nerd Matt Ocko, of Data Collective Venture Capital, about real opportunities (a la beyond the hype) for big data technologies. DCVC has put seed money into database companies (MemSQL) and satellite companies (Planet Labs).

And if that chat leaves you wanting more, you can get it when Ocko speaks at Structure Data next month in New York). Last week’s guest, Hilary Mason will be there as well. So come for an embarrassment of data riches; stay for the parties!

 

 

 

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Hosts: Barb Darrow and Derrick Harris.

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