New from Watson: Financial advice and a hardcover cookbook

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Credit: Sourcebooks

IBM has recruited a couple of new partners in its quest to mainstream its Watson cognitive computing system: financial investment specialist Vantage Software and the Institute of Culinary Education, or ICE. While the former is exactly the kind of use case one might expect from Watson, the latter seems like a pretty savvy marketing move.

What Vantage is doing with Watson, through a new software program called Coalesce, is about the same thing [company]IBM[/company] has been touting for years around the health care and legal professions. Only, replace health care and legal with financial services, and doctors and lawyers with financial advisers and investment managers. Coalesce will rely on Watson to analyze large amount of literature and market data, which will complement experts’ own research and possibly provide them with information or trends they otherwise might have missed.

The partnership with the culinary institute, though — on a hardcover cookbook — is much more interesting. It’s actually a tangible manifestation of work that IBM and ICE have been doing together for a few years. At last year’s South By Southwest event, in fact, Gigaom’s Stacey Higginbotham ate a meal from an IBM food truck with ingredients suggested by Watson and prepared by ICE chefs.

Source: I

The IBM food truck.

But even if the cookbook doesn’t sell (although I will buy one when it’s released in April and promise to review at least a few recipes), it’s a good way to try and convince the world that Watson has promise beyond just fighting cancer. IBM is banking on cognitive computing (aka artificial intelligence) to become a multi-billion-dollar business, so it’s going to need more than a handful of high-profile users. It has already started down this path with its Watson cloud ecosystem and APIs, where partners have built applications for things including retail recommendations, travel and cybersecurity.

Watson isn’t IBM’s only investment in artificial intelligence, either. Our Structure Data conference in March will feature Dharmendra Modha, the IBM researcher who led development of the company’s SyNAPSE chip that’s modeled on the brain and designed to learn like a neural network while consuming just a fraction of the power normal microchips do.

However, although we’re on the cusp of an era of smart applications and smart devices, we’re also in an era of on-demand cloud computing and a user base that cut its teeth on Google’s product design. The competition over the next few years — and there will be lots of it — won’t just be about who has most-accurate text analysis or computer vision models, or who executes the best publicity stunts.

All the cookbooks and research projects in the world will amount to a lot of wasted time if IBM can’t deliver with artificial intelligence products and services that people actually want to use.

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