Samsung is preparing a improved Galaxy Note 4, probably for Korea

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Samsung’s Galaxy Note 4 is less than a few months old, but it’s already getting an upgrade: On Monday, Samsung announced a new Galaxy Note 4 variant powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 810 processor.

The Snapdragon 810 will be Qualcomm’s flagship mobile chip in 2015. It’s likely to be at the heart of most of the top-tier Android phones launching this upcoming year — like the Galaxy S6, Sony’s Xperia Z4 and the high-end phone HTC is working onIMG_3533

The new Galaxy Note 4 is likely to benefit from the new silicon in two specific ways.

The United States version of the  Note 4 uses Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 805, which is one of the last 32-bit mobile chips. The Snapdragon 810 uses eight 64-bit cores, which the latest version of Android can take advantage of. Android 5.0 launched without a flagship 64-bit capable phone, and the new Note 4 can fill that gap until more Snapdragon 810-equipped devices hit the market.

The new Note should also be able to take advantage of Category 9 carrier aggregation for LTE-Advanced which should result in faster mobile broadband speeds. The new Note 4 supports aggregating 3 x 20 MHz data channels, so the device can theoretically download data as quickly as 450 Mbps on networks that support it. In reality, users won’t see speeds close to the what can be done in a lab. The United States is somewhat behind other countries at adopting carrier aggregation. For instance, South Korea’s SK Telecom started testing the technology on its network in 2013. AT&T has used only used carrier aggregation to boost speeds in some parts of the United States since March.

The Snapdragon 810-equipped Note 4 will be the phone’s third variant. In addition to the two [company]Qualcomm[/company]-powered versions, there’s a Galaxy Note 4 variant equipped with Samsung’s own Exynos 5433 chip.

special version of the Galaxy S5

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jjj

They announced it now because many more are arriving.
The data speed is pretty irrelevant given the cost of data (450Mbps would be 3.375GB per min and at some 10$ per GB US data prices….i’ll take 100 times slower and 10 times more data anyday ).
The NAND might be too slow for that speed unless they upgraded that too.
The speed is theoretical ,the user never actually gets it and that makes it false advertising.
And then if Snapdragon 810 can only clock to just bellow 2GHz, it’s a bit of a dud. The better cores are offset by much lower clocks vs 801 and 805 (2.5GHz and 2.66GHz). There are some gains in encryption perf and a few non CPU things but 2GHz would be a rather big letdown (rather atypical for them).
Makes you wonder how Qualcomm changing CEO relates to the crop of current chips and antitrust investigations, they might have some difficult years ahead.

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