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Sony: 2 million people have streamed The Interview

Over 2 million people have purchased or rented The Interview since it started streaming on December 24th, according to an announcement from Sony Pictures Entertainment (via Business Insider.)

The Interview raked in $15 million in online sales through Saturday night, which is five times larger than the $2.8 million weekend box office generated by the film’s limited release in 331 independent theaters.

The slapstick farce about North Korea starring James Franco and Seth Rogen is available from YouTube, Google Play, Xbox Video, and Sony’s own website. It costs $14.99 to buy and $5.99 to rent.

Apple also started selling The Interview on the iTunes store on Sunday. Its newfound availability on iTunes will make it easier for people with an Apple TV to watch the movie — previously, users had to purchase the movie on a computer or phone before watching it on their [company]Apple[/company] TV.

For a dumb comedy, The Interview has certainly had a tumultuous route to wide release. After a large cache of [company]Sony Pictures[/company] documents and emails was leaked, the movie had its release plans temporarily cancelled because of vague fears that North Korea could attack theaters in retribution for an unflattering portrayal of Kim Jong-un. Experts remain deeply divided about whether North Korea was involved with the Sony Pictures breach.

Because The Interview was officially released online before it opened in a limited number of theaters, many are closely watching its progress because it could be a bellwether for future “day and date” releases.

Last week, Variety reported that Netflix is “in talks” to stream The Interview, too.

follow-seth-rogan

The movie is still being promoted on social media. Twitter pushed a notification to its users on iOS and Android suggesting they follow Seth Rogen ahead of a planned live-tweeting of the film on Sunday.

 

 

5 Responses to “Sony: 2 million people have streamed The Interview

      • Lynn Thomas

        Yeah, they put several blockbusters that weren’t due out until next year on bit torrent websites, released damaging e-mails and personal information of their staff, erased hard drives, let major movie theater chains out if their contracts, so they could reap the huge payoff of $15M in online sales on a movie that cost over $40M to make. Yeah… They cannot pull one over on you! /s