Reports: US to confirm North Korea behind the Sony hack

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After much speculation, the U.S. government will reportedly confirm soon, as early as Thursday, that North Korea was responsible for the massive hack against Sony Pictures Entertainment, according to multiple reports from CNN, NBC and The New York Times. According to NBC, unnamed U.S. officials said that while the attacks originated outside the reclusive nation, the hackers were operating under orders from the North Korean government.

The mega hack, which started on November 24, took down Sony’s email systems and resulted in the leak of five movies — including Annie and To Write Love on Her Arms — as well as employee social security numbers, medical records and salary information. Private emails between Sony officials were also leaked and generated a lot of embarrassing attention for Sony.

The hack sent Sony on a downward spiral as it dealt with the ramifications of having private emails and sensitive documents unleashed to the public. On Tuesday, Sony employees filed a class-action lawsuit against the company for not providing enough security around their data and not taking the appropriate measures to protect them once their data was known to be breached.

On Wednesday, [company]Sony[/company] officially cancelled the December 25 release of the action-comedy movie The Interview, starring Seth Rogan and James Franco. The movie centers around a pair of Americans who have been assigned to assassinate Kim Jong-un, North Korea’s dictator-leader.

The decision to stop the movie’s screening came in light of a hacker group taking credit for the attack and indicating that some sort of violence would occur at theaters that play the movie.

North Korea previously denied that it was involved with the hack, but also seemed to enjoy the devastation it caused, according to a report in The New York Times.

In early December, a North Korean government spokesman told the BBC in response to the hack allegations, “The hostile forces are relating everything to the DPRK (North Korea). I kindly advise you to just wait and see.”

2 Comments

Jack C

I’m a little stunned by the fact that this isn’t being considered a bigger deal. I don’t think this really is (or will remain) just about Sony.

What exactly do people think next generation warfare will look like; what an attack will look like? I don’t mean to sound hyperbolic and I’m not saying this was an act of war, but isn’t this what (a component of) it *will* look like?

Sure, relatively speaking, it’s a baby step/shot off the bow, but it seems like a historic event to me. It also underscores how vulnerable the public (in this case, Sony’s employees) are in the new paradigm.

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