Amazon’s Jeff Bezos talks succession plan (sorta)

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The week in cloud

Last week, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos talked a bit on stage about what Amazon would be without him. At a Business Insider event, Bezos was asked the zillion-dollar succession question. After the slow-mo Microsoft CEO search we endured last year, that topic resonates.

And the answer was: Yes, [company]Amazon[/company] does have a CEO successor lined up should something happen to Bezos, as it does with all senior managers, presumably including the Amazon Web Services brain trust of Andy Jassy and Werner Vogels.

So who is that successor? Bezos put down the hammer: “It’s a secret.”

Also interesting is Bezos’ take on how Seattle-based Amazon differs from stereotypical Silicon Valley tech companies. There are no free gourmet-lunches and no suburban Montessori-school-like headquarters. Amazon’s culture revolves around its urban HQ and a definitive butt-in-chair work ethic.

And, in Bezos’ opinion, taking a job with the company that offers the best free massages may not be the optimal career choice for a young engineer. More here from Gigaom’s Jeff Roberts on the event..

The full segment is here.

Container-on-container violence

If you were on a tech media news blackout last week, you missed the dustup touched off when CoreOS launched its own Rocket container, in a move seen as a direct shot at Docker.

CoreOS’s contention is that while Docker adds orchestration and other trimmings to its container it’s sort of neglecting the container itself and that its process model is “fundamentally flawed.”

Docker cried foul. If a company wants to just use just the Docker container, it can do so although Docker’s “batteries included but removeable” slogan isn’t helping its cause.

It makes total sense for CoreOS to glom onto what it sees as a great thing to get a piece of the action, which is how many people see what’s transpiring. “Every time some piece of technology gains traction you see all these prospectors staking claims,” said one long time observer who thinks CoreOS hasn’t done itself any favors the way it went about this, blasting out a blog post on the eve of Dockercon.

This gold rush happened with Rails, it happened with Node.js, it happened with Linux, and now it’s happening with Docker, he said.

But it also looks like there’s fear that the Docker “platform” will encroach on stuff offered by third parties, which Docker CTO and Founder Solomon Hykes addressed in comments to this blog post by CloudCredo CEO Colin Humphreys. Hykes wrote:

“The fact that Docker is building a platform does not at all mean that ‘docker’, the command-line tool, will become bloated and monolithic. Quite the contrary! The major theme of Docker is in fact the exact opposite: to make it more modular, and make it easier to use one part without the other. In fact, the very features mentioned by the CoreOS blog post (machine management, clustering) will not, in fact, be incorporated into the Docker binary.”

Below check out a couple of relevant Structure Show podcasts. First, last week’s show with CoreOS CEO Alex Polvi in which he says there’s nothing wrong with Docker going the platform route, but people need just plain containers. Then one from July in which Hykes discusses (presciently) how tricky Docker governance was going to be going forward.

CoreOS CEO Alex Polvi

CoreOS CEO Alex Polvi

 

 

Docker Founder and CTO Solomon Hykes at DockerCon 2014

Docker Founder and CTO Solomon Hykes at DockerCon 2014

 

 

 

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Hosts: Barbara Darrow and Derrick Harris

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