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Launching open-source projects is easy, keeping them running well? Not so much

Facebook, which has already blazed trails in the open-source movement, launched a new project called TODO (short for “Talk Openly, Develop Openly”) that aims to help other organizations progress down the open-source route. This week’s Structure Show guest, James Pearce, who leads Facebook’s open source efforts, talks about why shared experiences and best practices are critical to assuring more successful use of open-source software.

It’s easy to start a project and throw it over the wall, but managing it once the software is in the wild is tricky business, Pearce noted. “The releasing part is relatively easy,” Pearce said. Once it’s launched and the community starts to adopt it is where some projects have run into problems, he noted.

todo

Companies aboard Todo thus far include [company]Box[/company], [company]Dropbox[/company], [company]Github[/company], [company]Google[/company], the Khan Academy, [company]Twitter[/company] and [company]Walmart Labs[/company].

Aaaaand, it was another frenetic week in the world of cloud — [company]Rackspace[/company] took itself off the market (can you really do that?) and Cisco snapped up [company]Metacloud[/company] for (a) its private OpenStack cloud business; (b) its private OpenStack cloud talent; or (c) both. So all of that is grist for the mill in the first 15 minutes of the show.

Facebook, James Pearce

If you’re sick of the sturm und drang in cloud M&A then just fast-forward to hear Pearce. It’s a great listen.

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Hosts: Barb Darrow and Derrick Harris

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