Workplace messaging app Cotap now lets you text documents from Box, Dropbox and others

Business man texting on cellphone

Enterprise messaging just became a little more practical. Cotap, a workplace texting app created by former Yammer Chief Product Officer Jim Patterson, now has file messaging. If your company uses Cotap, you can text a document from Box, Dropbox and Microsoft OneDrive. The recipient can view the doc in the app itself, much like they’d view an image someone texted them.

The rapidly growing Philz coffee chain has been using Cotap for six months now. Community builder Young Han said the new file sharing feature is hugely helpful. “This will be really great for us,” Han said. “We’re incredibly mobile — almost none of us sit at a desk, we’re always out networking and meeting people and talking about Philz.”

Philz’s use of the new feature highlights why the latest Cotap development is compelling. What might seem like a minor update is in fact a harbinger of the future of enterprise communication. It’s finally shifting to mobile in useful ways.

As workplace texting apps become more sophisticated, they become more useful for the worker on the go, moving workplace communication from where it has traditionally always taken place — the desktop — to mobile. It’s the same shift we saw with consumer chat, just happening a little later in the working world.

Cotap is tapping an open Box API for the new use case. Box’s API allows external messaging apps to call documents stored on Box servers, as well as the servers of its competitors.

Cotap doesn’t have a monopoly on the market. Just like in the crowded consumer messaging space, work chat has a range of competitors from BranchOut’s Talk.co to Tiger Text. New tools like in-app file sharing from the cloud give Cotap a slight edge. The company claims it’s the first to implement Box’s API.

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