Blog Post

Meet Renovo Motors: An electric supercar maker from Silicon Valley

If you thought the days of electric car innovation in Silicon Valley were over with the fall of Fisker and the rise of Tesla, think again. A startup called Renovo Motors, based in Campbell, Calif., just came out of stealth after four years and it is debuting a prototype of its electric supercar the “Renovo Coupe” at the Pebble Beach Concourse d’Elegance this weekend.

The Renovo Coupe is an electrified Shelby Daytona CSX9000, the classic racing car from 1964 designed by Peter Brock. It’s got 1,000 pounds of torque, can go 0-60 in under 3.4 seconds, has a weight of 3,250 pounds, and uses lithium ion batteries with a new modular design.

[vimeo 103445206 w=500 h=281]

The company (see disclosure) said it’s introducing a new battery architecture that is patent-pending and uses multiple separate battery enclosures to create weight distribution around the car that is focused on high performance and a small car body volume. Renovo said its drivetrain is “less than 40 percent of the total weight of the car,” but has super high peak power.

Much of the core body design work on Tesla’s Model S went into architecting the battery pack so it lays low and flat underneath the car. That optimized the weight distribution, the performance and the aerodynamics of the car.

Renovo Motor's Renovo Coupe. Image courtesy of Renovo Motors.
Renovo Motor’s Renovo Coupe. Image courtesy of Renovo Motors.

The Renovo Coupe is officially going on sale this weekend — I’m not sure for how much, but you can guess a bundle. Non-electrified Shelby Daytonas can go for several hundred thousand dollars. Limited production of the cars will start early next year.

If you want to check out the car, the company is giving test rides down at Pebble Beach this weekend.

Disclosure: Renovo Motors is backed by True Ventures, a venture capital firm that is an investor in the parent company of Gigaom.

10 Responses to “Meet Renovo Motors: An electric supercar maker from Silicon Valley”

  1. Any time the word super is in front of the noun, think expensive. Betting it will cost more than the Tesla Roadster did, which I agree was the first American electric super car. Will it need it’s own charging stations like Tesla or can I plug into the grocery store parking lot’s chargers while I get groceries?