FullStory takes in $1.2 million to help companies get better feedback on their websites

User Experience - generic

FullStory, a web analytics startup comprised entirely of ex-Googlers, has landed $1.2 million in its first round of funding, which the company plans on using to build out its sales and support staff and invest in engineering. Additionally, the company is now done with its beta period and is letting people formally sign up as customers on its site.

The Atlanta-based startup’s technology lets customers get direct feedback into how their websites are performing with their users. Basically, if a user spots a bug or something that looks out of whack on a website and decides to exit the site, FullStory’s software records all of the user’s interactions leading up to the person’s decision to leave, said FullStory co-founder and CEO Scott Voigt. From there, FullStory customers can take immediate action on improving their websites’ interface instead of having to wait on their engineering staff to figure out what is turning people away.

Similar to how a person can install a Google Analytics script on their websites, a FullStory customer can load up the company’s events-centric analytics script, which phones home to the customer every time an event — such as a person clicking on a webpage or entering a search term — takes place.

FullStory graphic detailing events timeline

FullStory graphic detailing events timeline

Regarding the issue of privacy, while FullStory does track a person’s actions on a website, Voigt said that FullStory’s tool is not for building profiles on people that can be bought or exchanged in the open web and FullStory has an acceptable use policy that the company makes all of their customers adhere to.

“At this stage of the game, it is very important for us to make sure everyone is a good actor,” said Voigt.

The founders of FullStory all used to be a part of Atlanta-based stealth startup called Innuvo, which was acquired by Google in 2005; the technology Innuvo was working on eventually became the Google Web Toolkit, a popular development framework that is used by many developers.

The investment round was driven by Google Ventures along with participant Tom Noonan, a former CEO of Internet Security Systems.

Post and thumbnail images courtesy of Shutterstock user kentoh.

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