New Relic debuts its next act: Insights real-time analytics

Moderated by:
Barb Darrow - Senior Writer, GigaOM	
Lew Cirne - Founder and CEO, New Relic	
Stephen O'Grady - Partner and Principal Analyst, RedMonk

New Relic’s application performance monitoring service is the darling of many developers. Want to know what’s slowing down your game or e-commerce app? New Relic will tell you. But New Relic wanted to do more with all that data and to bring real-time analytics to the masses — not just to data scientists in their big data ghetto.

Now the company is officially releasing Insights, its long-planned real-time analytics service to derive more information from the data it’s already collecting. Insights (once known as Project Rubicon) was in beta for a few months and is now generally available, along with a new mobile app that New Relic CEO Lew Cirne (pictured above) decided was necessary for on-the-spot checks for any time you’re away from your computer.

“Lew found himself in meetings wanting to run mobile Insights queries, so now we have it to give you access to your pre-created dashboards,” said Jim Gochee, VP of product at New Relic. The mobile app is now available for iOS with Android version to come.

So it’s one thing to know a database problem is killing app performance on the fly. It’s another to see in near-real-time what buttons or displays are driving actual sales versus just drawing looky-loos. New Relic says Insights does just that.

“There’s one online retailer who has its sales data in a data warehouse but it’s hard to access, so it’s feeding that data into Insight to spot trends, notice demographic behavior in selling patterns, what’s trending hot, et cetera,” Gochee said. And this is a tool that sales and marketing people can use, he said.


The company is giving a day’s worth of Insights data to its existing paid customers to try out. After that, price is determined by the amount of data stored by New Relic for analysis — minimum is $250 a month, Gochee said.

New Relic faces a lot of competition in its base  world — companies like AppDynamics, ThousandEyes and AppNeta. It’s banking that it can add features and functions faster than they can.



You're subscribed! If you like, you can update your settings


Comments have been disabled for this post