Dorian Nakamoto lawyers up, definitively denies being Bitcoin creator

Newsweek magazine alleged Satoshi Nakamoto, pictured here, was the creator of Bitcoin. He has since denied the accusation in an interview with the AP. Source: Satoshi Nakamoto/WagumaBher

Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto, the man identified by Newsweek as being Bitcoin creator “Satoshi Nakamoto”, has issued a categorical denial of having anything to do with the cryptocurrency.

The name “Satoshi Nakamoto” was always assumed to be a pseudonym for the inventor or inventors of Bitcoin, but around 10 days ago Newsweek published a purported scoop, sans definitive proof, pointing to a 64-year-old Japanese-American living near Los Angeles. The man, Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto, promptly told an AP reporter that he was not that Satoshi Nakamoto, despite Newsweek’s claims, and the technical community believed him for a variety of reasons.

The Newsweek article’s only direct quote from Nakamoto read: “I am no longer involved in that and I cannot discuss it… It’s been turned over to other people. They are in charge of it now. I no longer have any connection.” This quote had been verified by the cops that Dorian Nakamoto called when Newsweek reporter Leah Goodman came to his door.

Now Dorian Nakamoto has lawyered up and released an official statement denying any association with Bitcoin, present or past.

The statement was given on Sunday to Reuters’s Felix Salmon by lawyer Ethan Kirschner, who confirmed to Quartz that he was retained by Nakamoto. In it, the engineer said:

“I did not create, invent or otherwise work on Bitcoin. I unconditionally deny the Newsweek report.

“The first time I heard the term ‘bitcoin’ was from my son in mid-February 2014. After being contacted by a reporter, my son called me and used the word, which I had never before heard. Shortly thereafter, the reporter confronted me at my home. I called the police. I never consented to speak with he reporter. In an ensuing discussion with a reporter from the Associated Press, I called the technology ‘bitcom.’ I was still unfamiliar with the term.”

Nakamoto went on to say that the article had damaged his prospects for gainful employment and caused his family “a great deal of confusion and stress.” He added that he would have no further public statement on the matter.

Neither Goodman nor Newsweek has as yet responded to this statement.

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