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Co-curation tool Honey adds “tooing” for topics

Honey, the co-curation tool, has been updated with a variety of user experience tweaks, but most importantly they have implemented “tooing” as a sharing mechanism. I coined the term earlier this year for extra-group sharing:

Stowe Boyd, ‘Tooing’ beats teaming because all work is personal

In many cases, today collaboration tools don’t actually allow sharing of information except through membership.

I am heartened to see more tools that support extra-group sharing as a first-class modality. Asana, for example, supports the sharing of tasks (and subtasks) with individuals who are not members of the workspace or project where the tasks are defined. This allows Asana to be used as a personal tool — with all its rich task model — but without the slow-and-tight considerations of groups: ‘Who should I invite/exclude? I need to bring in Jenna to this group, but there are a few items here that I don’t want her to have access to, so I will need to create a different group, and move tasks from the old one to the new one.’ and so on. These are the sorts of costs that mount up in slow-and-tight organizations of work.

Because the term ‘sharing’ has so broad a usage, I will call this flavor of sharing ‘tooing’, as in ‘I have access to this task, and Jenna does too.’

Honey supports Topics, which are like folders. A user makes posts while browsing the web (via bookmarklet), by uploading a file, or creating a text post. These are placed in one or more of the topics. Note: a single post can appear in multiple topics, but is actually a single object with a shared comment thread.

In the case of Honey, the current model of tooing is still pretty wide-bore: an entire topic needs to be shared, not a single post.

Screen Shot 2013-09-12 at 16.27.13

In the worst case a user could create a topic for the purpose of co-curating specifically with another person, like a private channel, and avoid any issues of worrying about sharing too much. However, it would still share the comment thread, which provides a weird kind of back door.  I think Honey might want to provide a an option for the post to be copied — not shared — in such cases.

The Bottom Line

Honey continues to push forward with innovative business co-curation (although they call it a social intranet, a term that needs to quietly expire), and I await their upcoming developments. I am still waiting for fully public sharing, where anyone can follow my public topics, like Pinboard, as well as continuing to provide the private (only accessible to company staff) and secret (only known and accessible to those invited) topics as currently implemented.