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Why your next laptop could use Gorilla Glass just like your smartphone does

That amazingly strong Gorilla Glass on your smartphone now comes in a bigger size. On Monday, Corning introduced Gorilla Glass NBT, a stronger, scratch-resistant glass specifically made for touchscreen laptops. In a rather amusing video, Corning(s glw) demonstrates the strength of Gorilla Glass NBT.

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What else does the new touchscreen glass offer? Corning says it’s a better all-around choice over traditional soda-lime glass due to these features:

  • 8x-10x higher scratch resistance
  • Greater resistance to unsightly abrasions caused by cleaning, wiping or careless handling
  • Reduced incidence of damage when inadvertently closing  the display on top of an object
  • Better ability to withstand the shock of accidental bumps

Corning is pitching the new glass as cost-effective, suggesting it would only account for one to two percent of a laptop’s price tag.

Margins on those devices are pretty slim already but I suspect laptop makers will still adopt the new glass. The Gorilla Glass product is becoming well-known and desirable on smartphones and tablets; it could be differentiating factor when choosing two similar notebooks in the future. Dell(s dell) is already on board, saying it will introduce new laptops this fall with Gorilla Glass NBT.

4 Responses to “Why your next laptop could use Gorilla Glass just like your smartphone does”

  1. It enables for a deep layer associated with high compressive stress (created through an ion-exchange process). This compression provides a sort of “armor,” making the glass exceptionally tough as well as damage proof.

  2. It’s nice to finally see something new considering progress has been stifled for around the last 8 years with notebook displays.

    That said, I think it’s high time PC panel manufacturers got off the TV bandwagon – I want something higher than 1080P on my 17″ notebook.