Scale-out storage still matters as Scality raises $22M

hard disk drive

Remember a couple years ago, when every scale-out file system under the sun was either getting acquired or raising boatloads of venture capital? Apparently, that era isn’t over yet, as San Francisco-based startup Scality has closed a $22 million Series C round from Menlo Ventures and Iris Capital, as well as participation from FSN PME and existing investors Idinvest Partners, OMNES Capital and Galileo Partners. It has raised $35 million in venture capital so far.

Scality sells a storage technology called RING, which the company refers to as an “object storage technology with full scale-out file system support.” As one might expect, RING runs on commodity servers, features a shared-nothing architecture, scales automatically and balances load across the machines in the cluster. The sheer scale and automated nature of this type of system makes it a natural fit for workloads such as cloud storage and big data, while the high throughput that Scality promises makes it more appealing for high-performance tasks such as media production or oil and gas exploration.

Scality has been selling its software since 2010.


0 and claims some major U.S. and European telco and media companies as customers. It also claims adoption has been picking up, if its 400 percent year-over-year sales growth is any indicator.

Ah, but Scality plays in a crowded space where seemingly countless startups and large vendors offer at least part of what it promises. Among them: Gluster/Red Hat Storage Server, EMC Isilon, DataDirect Networks, IBM General Parallel File System, Lustre, Scale Computing, Exablox, Ceph, Coraid and OpenStack Swift. Of course, if you’re keen on cloud computing, there’s always Amazon Web Services’ S3 offering, and the Hadoop Distributed File System is increasingly popular for big data environments.

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