WalkMe raises $5.5 million to guide you through the web

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We’ve all had that moment on a confusing website where the tabs or links just don’t take us where we want to go, and we’re tempted to give up before calling a phone number or emailing customers support. Sometimes it’s just not worth the effort to keep trying. But WalkMe, the startup that helps you make your way through complicated webpages, has raised a $5.5 million series B funding round to keep you trying a little longer.

WalkMe provides tutorials that take users through webpages, providing pop-up balloons triggered by a user’s actions that tell them how to proceed. The technology works on top of a the existing websites so it doesn’t have to be built in, and can be tailored for the complexity or variations of individual sites. It can take sales staff through basic tasks in Salesforce’s software, or help users who might not speak English as their first language.

The financing round was led by Gemini Israel Ventures and was joined by Mangrove Capital Partners and Giza Venture Capital. Mangrove Capital Partners provided the company’s earlier funding round this year in April. Rafi Sweary, the President of Tel Aviv-based WalkMe, said the service has grown exponentially since it received funding in April, and they’re looking to expand their own sales staff and forge larger partnerships withe the additional funding.

WalkMe has a free version for small-scale users, and then scales its pricing depending on the number of walk-throughs a company needs, and how many users are going through the process.

Sweary explained that a site needing help guiding users through isn’t necessarily a poorly-designed site. Sometimes certain audiences need more help than others, and he said WalkMe is an inexpensive alternative to having a large support staff:

“No matter how simple your site is, you have to have  support strategy,” he said. “Maybe it’s because your users are older, or maybe it’s because they’re younger, or maybe it’s because their native language is not English, or maybe your site is complicated. It can only be intuitive up to a certain point.”

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