@ F8: Facebook Unveils New Class Of Social Apps And Redesigned ‘Timeline’

3 Comments

Credit: Tom Krazit

Facebook unveiled a new version of its social-media platform Thursday designed to help media companies and social-application developers encourage Facebook users to share more details about their lives. The new Open Graph and several varieties of Facebook applications were joined by a redesigned version of the Facebook profile called the Timeline that CEO Mark Zuckerberg said would allow people to curate “the story of your life” on a single Facebook page.

The Timeline redesign will likely be jarring to Facebook’s famously change-averse users, but Zuckerberg and Facebook director of product management Chris Cox said that the idea was to allow people to create virtual scrapbooks of their lives through Facebook. Users will be able to sort their Timelines by certain pieces of content, such as clicking on button that will display all the photos taken of you in the last year. The new Timeline will be rolling out over the next several weeks, and it will be the home for a new set of social applications.

Facebook users are familiar with social games that allow them to brag about their progress or collaborate with their Facebook friends on certain achievements, but they’ll now be able to share other types of activity like the music they’re listening to or the “lifestyle” accomplishments in their lives, such as running five miles or visiting a new restaurant. Netflix (NSDQ: NFLX), Nike, Foodspotting, and Spotify are among the partners who will have applications based on the new version of Facebook’s Open Graph, which allows developers to build social applications on top of Facebook’s technology.

Zuckerberg also announced a recent milestone for the company: 500 million people used Facebook on a single day recently. The company also updated the overall number of people using Facebook to 800 million.

3 Comments

Tim Schreier

That is why I mentioned the NHL.  Professional Hockey would be ideal as they are looking for more fans to view the product.  Also, with the record industry in a state of flux, imagine what this could do for viewership, research and participation with the Grammy Awards….  I know the NFL and MLB as well as NCAA might be too big to go after, and FB does not seem to want to pay for content.  Does it not stand to reason that an industry or league looking to expand would want to participate?

Tim Schreier

I am curious.  Why was live programing not included in this offering of the Open Graph?  I am thinking Award Shows, NFL, NHL, MLB, NCAA, Political Debates…  Programming where people have stated and very direct opinions and thoughts.  It would appear to me that FB and the NHL would be perfect partners; live programming with opinions (ie bar rooms) and discussions and NHL is in need of expanded fan base…  Just seems like a natural vs. scripted content…  I can also see live television talk shows being a big part of the future of Open Graph…  But why would they not debut with “live”?  Anyone have any insights on this?

Tim Schreier
New York, NY

Tom Krazit

I’ve always sort of wondered that myself, but the rights negotiations must be very tricky and Facebook may not be willing to take on that kind of back-end hosting project at the moment. Google has started doing some things with YouTube and political debates/sporting events/concerts, I bet they’ll do more of that in the future.

Comments are closed.