Data is the new platform, and social is the intelligence

23 Comments

Gavin Michael - Global Managing Director, R&D and Alliances, Accenture - Structure 2011The days of viewing everything in the cloud through an application lens is nearing its end. Now, we are evolving into a world where quantity, processing speeds and distribution of data will make us see the world through a data lens, according to Gavin Michael, global managing director for R&D and alliances at Accenture, during GigaOm’s Structure on Thursday.

“We see data taking its rightful place as another platform inside enterprise,” Michael said.

Michael was on hand to present the Accenture Technology Vision 2011, a cross-industry research project that takes stock of the evolving trends in IT and how they will impact business and society as a whole. The research team looked into 400 hypotheses based on input from scientists, architects and engineers. They found fifty that held true, which they consolidated into eight trends:

  • Data takes its rightful place as a platform.
  • Analytics is driving a discontinuous evolution from business intelligence.
  • Cloud computing will create more value higher up the stack.
  • Architecture will shift from server-centric to service-centric.
  • IT security will respond rapidly, progressively—and in proportion.
  • Data privacy will adopt a risk-based approach.
  • Social platforms will emerge as a new source of business intelligence.
  • User experience is what matters.

During his presentation, Michael underscored the idea that data in the cloud has all sorts of different shelf lives, with some information only useful for minutes. “Distributed data is rapidly becoming the new normal,” he said.

He also emphasized the idea that cloud computing will create more value higher up the stack.

“We look at the cloud and notice it’s time for a new convergence away from infrastructure as a service to value coming from the cloud as we move higher up the stack,” he said. “Cloud will have its real impact in areas such as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and Platforms-as-a-Service (PaaS).”

Finally, he said consumers are diving the major evolution in IT trends like never before.

“Technology is back on the agenda from a point of innovation and growth,” he said. “We are entering a new reality where consumers are more demanding through the emergence of technology. And the way in which we make decisions based in enterprise is changing based on analytic power of these new platforms.”

23 Comments

Rich

For me, this article read like a list of Yogi Berra quotes. For example, “Cloud computing will create more value higher up the stack.” How about using a real-life example once in a while to explain what you mean?

Matt McKinney

What a joke. This whole Social Platform crap gets deeper everyday. In my next job I want to be a Social Media Consultant and charge stupid CEO’s who take this crap so seriously millions to implement a strategic social network ad campaign.

Steve Christensen

Social networking, the good old fashioned consumer type, is threatening the IT Industrial Complex: software vendors, consultants and IT Dept. employees. Eisenhower warned of the Military Industrial Complex in the ’50s. We have all been witness to the rise of the ITIC over the past two decades. Enterprise software vendors, specifically ERP, build more and more complex software that tangles the data in tightly integrated and outdated processes and technology.

ITIC feeds on their ‘host’ company by syphoning off budget, resources and time. In exchange 93% of their projects are late and cost more than expected 59% of the time (source Panorama Consulting). After 18+ months of disruptive and expensive implementation, the customer receives 68.6% of the benefit (source: SearchSAP.com). Customers spend collectively $250B per year on enterprise software according to Gartner. Constellation Research identifies the average age of an ERP is 11.5 years old. Gartner further estimates it would cost $500B in 2010 to bring customers up to the most recent version…rising to $1T by 2015.

So version-freeze the ERP. Let it leak the data it guards so jealously. It is version 1.yours anyway. You can’t upgrade without a rip and replace. If you continue to modify you might as well rip and replace. You can’t rip and replace because you don’t have the budget, resources or time to continue the ITIC route.

What lesson is ITIC being taught by tech darlings such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, et al? That as consumers we enjoy powerful collaboration and communication functionality as pop-up IT without any ITIC involvement. As consumers we have more powerful technology at our fingertips than our employer – which wasn’t the case a few short years ago.

The ultimate goal of BI was to improve performance. Yet performance is executed in the processes and transactions that are locked in the technology wrapped around tightly integrated data. Making matters worse, many BI projects turned the BI into a data integration hub…in other words sucking it back into the cold, brutal hands of ITIC.

So instead, focus on enhancing the process, data and technology of the transactions your employees, vendors and customers execute. New enterprise technology exists that allow you to de-couple the death grip of your ERP without harming its understanding or control. With this non-technical layer of innovation stretched over your ERP new strategies can be pursued that improve productivity, accuracy and visibility. Along with the visibility aspect is the ability to “publish” information to a secure social network (i.e. chatter or yammer). Collaborative teams access this “information” so that they can improve their performance. The intelligence of how they resolve problems or create opportunities can now be added to future strategy.

Steve Christensen

Social networking, the good old fashioned consumer type, is threatening the IT Industrial Complex: software vendors, consultants and IT Dept. employees. Eisenhower warned of the Military Industrial Complex in the ’50s. We have all been witness to the rise of the ITIC over the past two decades. Enterprise software vendors, specifically ERP, build more and more complex software that tangles the data in tightly integrated and outdated processes and technology.

ITIC feeds on their ‘host’ company by syphoning off budget, resources and time. In exchange 93% of their projects are late and cost more than expected 59% of the time (source Panorama Consulting). After 18+ months of disruptive and expensive implementation, the customer receives 68.6% of the benefit (source: SearchSAP.com). Customers spend collectively $250B per year on enterprise software according to Gartner. Constellation Research identifies the average age of an ERP is 11.5 years old. Gartner further estimates it would cost $500B in 2010 to bring customers up to the most recent version…rising to $1T by 2015.

So version-freeze your ERP. Let it leak the data it guards so jealously. It is version 1.yours anyway. You can’t upgrade without a rip and replace. If you continue to modify you might as well rip and replace. You can’t rip and replace because you don’t have the budget, resources or time to continue the ITIC route.

So what lesson is ITIC being taught by tech darlings such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, et al? That as consumers we enjoy powerful collaboration and communication functionality as pop-up IT without any ITIC involvement. As consumers we have more powerful technology at our fingertips than our employer – which wasn’t the case a few short years ago.

The ultimate goal of BI was to improve performance. Yet performance is executed in the processes and transactions that are locked in the technology wrapped around tightly integrated data. Making matters worse, many BI projects turned the BI into a data integration hub…in other words sucking it back into the cold, brutal hands of ITIC.

So instead, focus on enhancing the process, data and technology of the transactions your employees, vendors and customers execute. New enterprise technology (http://babblewareinc.com) exists that allow you to de-couple the death grip of your ERP without harming its understanding or control. With this non-technical layer of innovation stretched over your ERP new strategies can be pursued that improve productivity, accuracy and visibility. Along with the visibility aspect is the ability to “publish” information to a secure social network (i.e. chatter or yammer). Collaborative teams access this “information” so that they can improve their performance. The intelligence of how they resolve problems or create opportunities can now be added to future strategy.

Blaw

Actually, social is the new data. It’s not only about objects any longer, but also about relationships and interactions between those objects. And of course some of these objects may be humans.

Steve Christensen

For 20+ years enterprises have been amassing vast repositories of data. For the same 20+ years results have taken forever, costed an arm and a leg and been less than impressive. Consultants get to extend their contracts with tantalizing stories of being able to detect the butterfly wings in Africa that start a storm. Enterprise software vendors, specifically ERP, build more and more complex software that tangles the data in tightly integrated and outdated processes and technology.

I do agree with the impact that secure Social Networking can have on the enterprise … just not in the way expected. Social networking, the good old fashioned consumer type, is threatening the IT Industrial Complex: software vendors, consultants and IT Dept. employees. Eisenhower warned of the Military Industrial Complex in the ’50s. We have all been witness to the rise of the ITIC over the past two decades.

This vast organism feeds on their ‘host’ company, syphoning off budget, resources and time. In exchange 93% of their projects are late and cost more than expected 59% of the time (source Panorama Consulting). After 18+ months of disruptive and expensive implementation, the customer receives 68.6% of the benefit (source: SearchSAP.com). Customers spend collectively $250B per year on enterprise software according to Gartner. Constellation Research identifies the average age of an ERP is 11.5 years old. Gartner further estimates it would cost $500B in 2010 to bring customers up to the most recent version…rising to $1T by 2015.

So what lesson is ITIC being taught by tech darlings such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, et al? That as consumers we can enjoy powerful collaboration and communication as pop-up IT without any ITIC involvement. As consumers we have more powerful technology at our fingertips than a company that did the full ERP implementation.

The ultimate goal of BI was to improve performance. Yet performance is executed in the processes and transactions that are locked in the technology wrapped around tightly integrated data. In hind sight, the data should have never been at the center of the ERP to begin with….but it is. Making matters worse, many BI projects turned the BI into a data integration hub…in other words sucking it back into the cold, brutal hands of ITIC.

So version freeze the ERP. Let it leak the data it guards so jealously. It is version 1.yours anyway. You can’t upgrade without a rip and replace. If you continue to modify you might as well rip and replace. You can’t rip and replace because you don’t have the budget, resources or time to continue the ITIC route.

Focus on enhancing the process, data and technology of the transactions your employees, vendors and customers execute. New enterprise technology (http://babblewareinc.com) exists that allow you to de-couple the death grip of your ERP without harming its understanding or control. With this non-technical layer of innovation stretched over your ERP new strategies can be pursued that improve productivity, accuracy and visibility. Along with the visibility aspect is the ability to “publish” information to a secure social network (i.e. chatter or yammer). Collaborative teams access this “information” so that they can improve their performance. The intelligence of how they resolve problems or create opportunities can now be added to future strategy.

Mark

Holy cow, did Dogbert write this article? Could the points be any more cryptic? Reminds me why I didn’t pursue a Phd.

Shankar Saikia

DATA & SOCIAL – ACCENTURE’S HYPE IS PATHETIC

This is another case Accenture trying to hype social media and “big data” without any cogent explanation or proof. As one of the commentors points out, I would not trust Accenture’s views. Besides, these points are way to general. This is a horrible post on Gigaom.

pc

I honestly try not to listen anymore when Accenture comments on technology futures. You know the saying about “even a broken clock is right twice a day”, well more and more that clock has managed to be wrong less than twice a day…

Christopher Regan

Yikes! This article out-buzzwords even Gartner and Forrester — and, that’s a difficult task. Have to go — I think my cloud is converging.

Jiminy

“Data is the new platform, and social is the intelligence” and you will find neither data nor intelligence here. But pointless waffle abounds.

Eyso

“Das leben der anderen + a gazillion ambiguous buzzwords”
“I wanted to invent facebook and posess all that precious data but I have no clue whatsoever so I pretend to foresee the future”

How much sarcasm is needed to push the ICT market from a hollow buzzwords culture to a no-nonsense get things done culture?

Guru

This is a Joke, How many times these “Analysts” wrong then right? they are good at speculating but never accurately. None of these “Analysts” predicted anything right, cloud, facebook, iPhone list goes on… They should stop paying high fee and bluffing us, Just look into any social media page, you get more insights.

Abhishek

We forget that “Social” means “Facebook” and are mistaking trend for vision.

Andrei

I know that buzzwords are huge attraction for people who “writing or blogging or talking” for living, but name and content of this article/post above is way too funny and attracted my comment too (could not resist, sorry):
1) Data is the platform for last 60 years at least for intelligent humans (my mom suggested to me to stay away from unintelligent ones).
2) Business intelligence was never a real thing – it was a marketing umbrella, abused by over-sized monsters like IBM, SAP, SAS, Microsoft and Oracle who are trying to buy “intelligence” from other companies instead of building it from within/inside.
3) That means that statement like “Social platforms will emerge as a new source of business intelligence” is unintelligent and means basically “Time Wasting Sites will emerge as new source of Nothing”
4) Intelligence is a human attribute and cannot be artificial or business or social

Andrei
http://apandre.wordpress.com/

JJ

Andrei
I would agree/reinforce some of your analysis of this article, but kindly disagree with other points…I think Gavin Michael is simply revealing where the use of technology in the business world has already arrived, though its use is still in the early stages.
To your points:
1) True. every client facing application used today has some sort of data platform behind it. MS Word even has to have it, how else would they be able to run a spell check? It checks my word against a set of data…
2) Business Intelligence is simpy a fancy buzz word for “Reports”. The information that is collected to be analyzed to look at historical and current business decisions, in an attempt to predict future opportunities.
3) Given the redefinition of #2, the author is simply saying that Social Platforms(fb,Twitter, LinkedIn etc.) will emerge as a new source of business reporting and analytics. I say to this, it is already here, not emerging. However, the potential use of this amount and type of data is larger than what is currently being used today. And companies will be trying to use the information gathered in the social network arenas to help drive those business decisions that increase their worth.
4) Agreed. the intelligence is not in the data, it is in the person that is putting it all together and can lead others using what the data has to offer.

JJ

Steve Ardire

Nicely stated!….’Data is the platform’ is marketing buzz tripe and those ‘8 trends’ that Gavin Michael stated are obvious ( well worn repeats ) or axiomatic.

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