Microsoft Reportedly Considering Wireless Payments For Windows Phone 7

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Credit: Microsoft

Maybe this phone-as-wallet thing really is finally ready to take off. Bloomberg is reporting that Microsoft (NSDQ: MSFT) is set to jump on the NFC (near-field communications) bandwagon in a upcoming release of Windows Phone 7.

Microsoft would join Google (NSDQ: GOOG), which has been quite public about its plans, RIM (NSDQ: RIMM), and possibly Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) in pledging support for NFC technology, which would allow phones to act as wireless payment cards when swiped near a reader at a retail store or kiosk. There is much to be worked out between the mobile companies and the payments industry, which is how RIM’s interest in the space came to be known, but if Microsoft is ready to throw its support behind the technology in addition to the market leaders, retail stores will be more interested in holding up their end of the bargain.

That’s because a successful NFC system will require phones to come with the chip, software on the phones to process the payment, retailers to carry the wireless readers, and some sort of back-end payment system to make sure everything gets routed properly. For that reason, among others, interest in wireless payments has been high among mobile computer companies for some time but actual wireless payments have been rare.

It’s not clear whether or not Microsoft plans to work on an NFC phone with Nokia (NYSE: NOK) or with another Windows Phone 7 license, although Bloomberg reported Microsoft’s first NFC phone is expected to arrive this year. The rumor mill has been mixed on whether or not Apple is planning this type of system for the iPhone 5, but Google has already gone ahead and had Samsung put an NFC chip in the Nexus S.

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RadioFreeOmaha

80%? What’chu talkin’ ’bout, Willis? If this era’s pretend capitalists–quaintly, they’re called Republicans–get even more of their way, desiring even greater industries-wide merger efforts ‘consolidating’ true capitalism, the free marketplace and honest competition right (and I do mean right) out of the American landscape, it’ll be more like 90%. BUT with monthly fees added on, for your continuing usage. I mean that’s only fair, right? And I do mean right–because there is no reason in their minds why low- or middle-class people should have any money in their pockets, other than to have it handy to give to the rich and the Republicans. Why does this economic abortion happen here in the U.S.? Well, it’s because there are so many rubes who have failed to realize, to quote Harry S, that if you want to live like a Republican you damn well better vote like a Democrat. So, as these right-wing financial abortionists continue to bellow “socialism!” at every proper reform effort so as to distract and scare said rubes and thus cover their bloody tracks, while these Republicans feed these rich who feed these Republicans who feed these rich usw at their insatiable hog slough and the coddled corporations become ever more flabby because they have in their favor the world’s most unlevel playing field, well, I have to say that, yes, I wish I were living in a different era. Although I’d choose not the ’90s, after this anti-American sludge really got rolling with Reagan, but the ’60s, the last time America was America.

TVFromMV

I think as long as the payments don’t go threw the mobile companies themselves things should be OK. Can you imagine AT&T and Verizon handling payments. We would be applying a 80% fee schedule on every payment. I think RadioFreeOmaha is still living in the 90’s

RadioFreeOmaha

This is a great idea. Except it shouldn’t be just wireless–Microsoft should be willing to pay us to use their devices by sending checks by snail mail. That way, it wouldn’t be only the wireless user–oh–what’s that you say? This article isn’t about MSFT paying people to use their crappy phones? Oh. Well, to quote Roseanne Rosannadanna, “never mind.” And, say, Redmond, expect a whole bunch of “never minds” from the marketplace. We out here aren’t nearly as dumb as we were in the ’90s, where you still live. And where your stuff still sucked.

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