Guardian’s iPhone App Sold 9,000 Downloads In First Two Days

4 Comments

Guardian.co.uk’s new iPhone app got some favourable reviews upon its release on Sunday night. Even more favourable – it shifted 9,000 in the first two days, Guardian News & Media told us.

At £2.39 a pop in the UK, that’s £21,510 in 48 hours – or, assuming Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) is taking its 30 percent app commission, about £15,056 (NB. it’s $3.99 in the U.S. and

4 Comments

Dave

Shame this application no longer works since the update… Come on Guardian, we paid for this app, get it fixed!!!

Vanessa Daly

The Guardian like many other newspapers is faced with declining ad revenues and is looking at ways to monetize their content. But rather than choosing the best option, which is using a billing system to charge for their content, they’ve gone for the lazy option and developed a mobile app. Apps are fun to design but a nightmare to deliver. The bigger question for newspapers is that if advertising revenue isn’t a sustainable business model, how do you deliver content that mobile users can easily pay for?

You can read a full review here http://bit.ly/8DHTYC

Robert Andrews

“how is this sustainable with a one-off charge” — Same reason other pay-for apps are successful. Not everyone gets it in the first day.

Will Brown

Good on the Guardian.

However impressive the initial take-up is and resulting revenue, how is this sustainable with a one-off charge? They’ll pay for the app’s development pretty quickly but once most Guardian readers who own an iphone are on board what then?

The paper’s FAQ on the subject states:

“Are there further costs?

At the moment you can use the app to read or listen to as much Guardian content as you like at no extra cost. We are committing to offering a core level of service for the one-off charge but that doesn’t rule out the possibility of charging for extra functionality at some point in the future.”

So it remains to be seen whether a subscription model is to be used or perhaps an upgrade fee for future releases. I’m guessing that for now this is a toe in the water to see what level of charging customers will put up with. The other titles watch with baited breath no doubt.

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