22 Responses to “Re-Downloading Deleted iPhone Apps May Become Costly in OS 3.0”

  1. Bruce Foote

    I have repeatedly tried to resync apps and they do not show up on iPhone after syncing even after I check the box under apps in the computer. If I go to the app store on the iPhone, the apps shows as installed and will not let me repurchase it again. I sync with the computer and it does not reload even though it show up on my computer in itunes under apps. Anybody have a solution?

  2. @Neurotic Nomad – yes, I realize that the “geeks” among us can find and backup the iPhone apps. But the average Joe Consumer simply cannot. If it doesn’t download to their desktop – it simply doesn’t exist to them. Package what? Right-click where? What’s a .app? I’m sure you’ve run across those questions if you’ve ever tried helping someone over the phone who isn’t as Mac-savvy as you are.

    It seems to me that at the very least, there needs to be a button in iTunes that will backup your iPhone/iPod Touch apps and allow you to select the location of the backed up files.

  3. Howie Isaacks

    While this seems like it would be a major pain in the butt, the way around this is to make sure that you keep your iPhone/iPod touch synched with your computer. Problem solved.

  4. @Gazoobee “It will also be a boon to the developers in that if you purposely delete the app that you paid for from your computer, there is now no way to get it back for free. This is also completely reasonable behaviour.”

    This is like saying you can’t reinstall anything. For example if I bought a game or piece of software for my computer, and I have uninstalled it as I needed space for another project. That I cannot reinstall because thats just an acceptable practice of the developer. No I paid for it, I own rights to have a copy weither I have to download again, or reinstall via a cd the options should be available without a repurchase, provided the software version that I own is the most current.

    On your note of bandwith use I agree, to the extent of my above comment, if the version that is online, is what I have, and I have purchased I have every right to delete, redownload, reinstall. I paid for a license I deserve the ability to use.

    Now as per the comment that this was just an iPod screen, maybe they are the lesser of the individuals and it wont affect iPhone users. I can’t see this situation being the case as it has been in the past. But I dont think either should suffer because they deleted and want to reinstall. If it is something constant of reinstalling every now and then like the poster said they do with Shazam, I can somewhat see the otherside of the scale, as is with the Bandwith usage.

    But hey, as long as you still resync you’ll be fine so the issue is only half an issue in reality, and that is mainly for the on the fly downloader.

  5. It’s been proven over and over and over again that draconian anti-piracy measures kill the ones that introduce them, not the pirates. The pirates will always have a way, it’s the little people, that are actually willing to pay for their software that suffer the consequences.

  6. @ James Dempsey : You CAN back them up to CD or HD. Seach your hard drive for .ipa files. (Or if you use a Mac, right click on the app in iTunes and choose “Reveal in Finder”) – the fact that the store is tied to the iTunes application (not acessable via web browser) is a seperate issue (one that may be solved with HTML5).

    @ Gazoobee : “In the scenario you describe wherein you are downloading Shazam on the fly, you are basically using the app store’s bandwidth as a sort of free storage facility that it was never intended for. You are basically leaching bandwidth from the store to deal with your own lack of organisation or foresight, or in loading the apps on your iPhone.”

    I agree with all of that, but all over-the-air restrictions automatically smell of AT&T to me.

  7. Gazoobee

    The new “feature” you are describing here is in place simply to prevent account switching and associated stealing of apps and is perfectly reasonable for that purpose although you fail to even discuss that aspect of it. It will also be a boon to the developers in that if you purposely delete the app that you paid for from your computer, there is now no way to get it back for free. This is also completely reasonable behaviour.

    In the scenario you describe wherein you are downloading Shazam on the fly, you are basically using the app store’s bandwidth as a sort of free storage facility that it was never intended for. You are basically leaching bandwidth from the store to deal with your own lack of organisation or foresight, or in loading the apps on your iPhone.

    It’s not like the average iPhone can’t store bazillions of apps anyway. What more do you want?

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