Blog Post

Stat Shot: Fiber to the Home

The Fiber to the Home Council yesterday released data that, in these times of carrier-constrained broadband, offers a glimmer of hope. Thanks to the efforts of Verizon (s VZ) and several smaller telecommunications companies, 15 million homes now have access to fiber broadband, with 32 percent of them opting for such a service over cable or DSL (or forgoing broadband altogether). A quarter of the fiber is being deployed by smaller carriers, which are typically located in rural areas and when it’s comes to upgrading their aging copper infrastructure, are choosing fiber as a way to future-proof their networks.

We’ve written about two such carriers, one of whom, West Plains Communications, credited Verizon’s FiOS deployment for lowering the cost associated with some of the equipment it had to buy to install fiber. Many of these smaller carriers stand to benefit from the economic stimulus plan, too. To that end, 58 percent of those surveyed told the FTTH Council that they would be likely to install fiber if given grant money, 45 percent said they’d install fiber if offered tax deductions, and 37 percent said they’d install fiber if they had tax credits.

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5 Responses to “Stat Shot: Fiber to the Home”

  1. I agree with Tony. Anybody who has seen the potential of fiber compared to copper, wireless or anything else, will understand it will definitely take a while before something better pops up. It is just the way to go rightnow.

  2. Tim – nothing is impossible but I don’t foresee any better wireline technology replacing FTTH. The only competitor is the existing coax and copper loop combined with fiber to the DSLAM or cable head end. Wireless will compete with a much longer last mile than the existing coax and copper but I believe broadband wireless will remain primarily a mobility technology. Simply, I don’t expect magic wires to replace fiber and wireless to replace wired at the home. However, many people will opt to go wireless at home when wireless speeds reach a certain sweet spot for price and bandwidth.
    P.S. – Sorry, forgot to tell you great post!

  3. Tim – nothing is impossible but I don’t foresee any better wireline technology replacing FTTH. The only competitor is the existing coax and copper loop combined with fiber to the DSLAM or cable head end. Wireless will compete with a much longer last mile than the existing coax and copper but I believe broadband wireless will remain primarily a mobility technology. Simply, I don’t expect magic wires to replace fiber and wireless to replace wired at the home. However, many people will opt to go wireless at home when wireless speeds reach a certain sweet spot for price and bandwidth.

  4. So we’re at about 4% as of March, and as good as fiber is, one wonders whether another more cost-effective technology will surpass it in the coming years – well before half of the people get it, with or without credit or grant money. leavethejobbehind.com