Initial Thoughts on iPhone OS 3.0

31 Comments

iphone_302

The blogosphere will be “all OS 3.0, all the time” for a while. I wanted to wait a little bit and see some reaction to the update.

Predictably, Paul Thurrott didn’t approve. He cherry-picked a few things and claimed they should have been there from the start. He conveniently ignored the new APIs and other enhancements, and then just griped about there being no hardware announcements. At a software event. The man gets less relevant about Apple every day.

To me, the biggest surprise came from another GigaOM network site, jkOnTheRun. An article there noted that 40 percent of the readers polled were “underwhelmed” with the update. A few even said the announcement “pushed” them to the Palm Pre.

What announcement did they watch? Seriously, there were some things introduced that, had Palm announced them today, I’m sure would have been proclaimed as incredible, stupendous, colossal, way ahead of the iPhone, etc.

What I liked best about the announcement was that it was typically Apple (s aapl). Sure, it included some “obvious” features, but it also included things no one had thought of or discussed.

Peer to Peer

This one is extremely interesting. As a developer you can write a device that will talk to another iPhone or accessory in question. It utilizes Apple’s proven Bonjour technology and wireless connection via Bluetooth (no Wi-Fi needed). No pairing is required, either.

This makes it a great impromptu setup for, say, the back seat of a car where your kids can play games with each other. The ability to talk to accessories is also big, and can be done over the dock connector as well as using BT.

1,000 New APIs

No, this isn’t big at all (*rolling eyes*). I still believe the biggest question mark on the Pre is using HTML/JAVA/CSS for app development. Some good stuff for the iPhone was written in this manner, but nothing like what we’ve seen since the bona-fide SDK. How will the Pre fair any better?

Meanwhile, the powerful SDK for the iPhone just took a leap ahead. You’ve got in-app e-mail capability, the proximity sensor is now available, the built-in iPod library is accessible, streaming audio and video over HTTP, a shake API is included, Apple’s data detectors are available, and even an in-game voice chat capability.

And that’s just scratching the surface of the new APIs for developers.

There’s also the push mechanism, which I think is great for background notification, though lacking elsewhere. I wrote about that here.

In-App Purchases

Another developer-enticing feature — and it’s hard not to see them excited by this — now you can sell your app for $5 or $10 but not allow every level, or every control. You can upsell for the more serious users willing to pay more, while still allowing the casual user to obtain an affordable version of your app. This makes a lot of sense to me.

Meanwhile, I applaud Apple’s decision to allow in-app purchases only for purchased apps. Some developers may balk at not being able to give it away and then upsell, but that’s borderline “bait and switch” in my opinion. I think Apple’s correct to claim that a free app should not prompt you to purchase anything.

Developer Demos

Depending on your interests, these ranged from interesting, to boring, to outright bizarre. But remember this was a software OS event. Sometimes there’s no better way to describe the use of a new capability than just to show it being done by others (some of which may be your own competition). These are, if you will, a “necessary evil” in an SDK demo.

I found ESPN’s demo pretty cool, and the medical apps amaze me as well.

Search

Apple’s implementation of this is sweet. Not only can you search in an app, like Mail, but they have a spotlight search page as well. I can search for songs, artists, calendar entries, etc. Bottom line is Apple brought Spotlight to the iPhone. Pretty obvious, but very nice.

Another cool feature is that for email it will search not just the 200 mail messages you have on the phone, but continue the search on the server as well. This is great! In fact, I may drop back to only 100 messages or so locally since I can now search them all anyway.

The Checklist Stuff

Then there’s the stuff Apple supposedly had to have. I say “supposedly” because Apple sold 17 million of these devices — 30 million with the touch — and 800,000,000 apps without any of these allegedly mandatory features.

  • Copy and paste looks well done. Frankly, until I can get my grubby little fingers on it and try to drag the targets, etc., I won’t know how well it works in practice, but it looks good.
  • I didn’t need MMS, but I’m glad I’ll have it. Some people I know don’t have smartphones (gasp!), so emailing a picture is pointless. They use MMS and I’d like to, too. Sucks that my 1G iPhone won’t support it, but I’m buying a new one with OS 3.0 anyway.
  • The landscape keyboard is a big thing for a lot of people, though it means nothing to me. I don’t use my thumbs to type. Still, it’s a pretty obvious feature to add and will likely make a lot of people happy.
  • I really like the improvements to the Messages app (formerly SMS?). Nice that I can delete specific messages and not the whole conversation. Also nice that I can forward messages.

Other Stuff

And then there were the things mentioned right at the end, with no further explanation or demo.

  • Notes syncing. I’ve avoided a lot of notes for this very reason, choosing instead to use an open email or text file on iDisk so that I’d gave access to it all. Now I can just use notes and be done with it.
  • Auto-Fill and anti-phishing should help Safari a lot.
  • Auto Wi-Fi login. I use Easy Wi-Fi now and can tell you this is a very handy feature.

And More…

The above is just a rough summary of today’s announcements. There’s clearly a lot more there that wasn’t touched on.

It’s going to be interesting to see reports out of the developer community who got the beta today. As they play with the above features, we’ll see how they are implemented and get more details.

Anybody who thinks this upgrade is anything other than huge is deluding themselves. If 2.0 was the Enterprise upgrade with implementing Microsoft’s ActiveSync technology, then 3.0 is back to the developer and consumer community. Opening the floodgates on more useful and interesting apps while tossing in many of the “checklist items” people felt they needed.

I’m impressed with the breadth and scope of this release.

31 Comments

Nick

@Paul- Like I said, numbers served doesn’t mean it’s the best thing out there. Is windows the best OS out there for personal computers?

Flaunting those numbers does little in a debate over the merits of a device, unless you think every single customer in the world did a bang up job researching and understands every nuance and capability of said device.

Paul

RIM: 50 Million Served Since ‘99 / Apple: 30 Million Served Since 2007

I know naysayers iPhone is supposed to suck right? Meanwhile it is probably the most popular mobile device with over 25K apps and growing faster than all others!

The naysayers are plugging the Palm Pre without EVEN seeing it! The other moron above is talking Zune! HAHAHA Enough said!

DON

The peer-to-peer is especially interesting – it’s like the Zune’s social, only on Steroids!

Unlike the Zune’s social, that will allow you only to share a measly song or two for a rotten short period, on the iPhone it’s something that can be used in unlimited ways rather than the limited ways on a Zune!

It’s like Microsoft’s social, only better, because – it should actually be usable! Also, unlike the Zune, who’s users number far and in between, it’s not only usable, but one with millions of users!

SpamBuster

LOL at all the fanboys in this thread dismissing the Pre before it’s even released!

Jared

@TinkerToyTech:

You have to sign up for the iPhone developer program:

http://developer.apple.com/iphone/program/sdk.html

@Nick:

True. Good balanced response to all of this. My opinion is still that nothing is better than the iPhone/touch… that is, I’d rather have nothing than the iPhone/touch at this point in time.

I’ve held off buying an iPod touch for a different reason: I want 64GB. So for me, the best mobile device is nothing. When a 64GB or 128GB iPhone with a Pay as You Go plan arrives, I will buy it (my old AT&T PAYGO “plan” cost about $25 for three months, that’s how little I used it), but I just can’t afford to spend $2000 on a phone.

@Everyone:

There are tradeoffs. Not every phone will be strictly better or worse in every possible way. For many it appears Apple makes a great device that they are willing to live with. The 3.0 update will remove most of those “small” (obnoxious) reasons keeping people from using the iPhone/touch.

Pundits and smart alecks are missing the fact that what the iPhone does is not just some marketing gimmick, but actually has substantial convenience/fun factor gains IN NORMAL usage. Walk into the Apple store or borrow a friend’s iPhone and you can learn how everything works without reading the manual, just by playing with it. The same could not be said of my lame cheapo “feature” phone. Sure it may have worked in theory, in the end, eventually, but every moment I used it I felt like throwing it at a wall.

I still think not enough is being made of the fact that now that the iPhone is “caught up” to other phones’ basic feature list(s), what about all the new cool stuff announced for the iPhone (like auto discovery, accessories) that when you put it all together (combined with the old stuff form 1.0 days, like tilt and multi-touch, ACTUALLY USABLE GUI INTERFACE, that no iPhone killer has offered yet) makes for a software platform TODAY untouched by any competitor?

People arguing that the UI usability and conventions that form the core of the iPhone OS are less important (“1.0 features”) or are just marketing gimmicks (that could have been added later) seem to be the same ones complaining about the lack of copy paste in iPhone 1.0. The truth is, in the end, on some level these are convenience issues that can be worked around: phones with less “fun” interfaces can still be used, sort of, and on the iPhone you can manually copy and enter text laboriously, if you have to (not fun). But just like two cars, one with and one without cruise control, in actual use the difference is stunning. There: Apple added cruise control (copy paste) to their luxury sports sedan. Now when are the other manufacturers going to add a steering wheel and brakes to their jalopies?

James Kendrick

Apple specifically stated yesterday that once an app is free it cannot charge for add-ons later. So no free lite versions upgradable within the app.

Nick

I love Apple and my MBP. I just bought a BlackBerry Bold over the iPhone. There are distinct advantages to each and every phone out there. I agree with Rob that Apple is adding features that other phones have had already, which is by definition catch up. There are definitely things about the iPhone that are much better than other phones as well.

Also, just because the iPhone is dominating sales, does not mean it’s the best device out there. That means they have the best marketing department. I think assuming every person out there that buys a phone is doing their due diligence and choosing the best one is a highly inaccurate assumption.

TinkerToyTech

I’m looking for the OS3 beta update, someone please pass on a link

Bart

Hi Tom,

Thanks for your article. I like your articles in general. Most of the time they’re much more well-thought and balanced than what seems to be usual in the blogosphere. I like that. Lots of bloggers seem to be too “digital”: either they like it (1) or they don’t (0), there is no in-between. Thanks for this balanced view on the announcement iPhone OS 3.0. And… I’m very exited about it, too!

Chris

Does in-app downloads/payments mean we could see an end of the “lite” versions of apps?

You download for free and then if you want/need the extra functionality/levels etc; then you pay from within the app and you get the full thing.

As for the arguments above. A lot of these announcements were for features that should’ve been included from the beginning. Copy & Paste, MMS, Landscape keyboard, adding more than 1 photo to e-mail and the SMS improvements should have been in 2.0 at the latest. This is the third version and it’s finally there? It’s a good OS but those were some major shortcomings. Yes 17m people bought an iPhone, me included, but that doesn’t mean those features were any less important. We all just chose to ignore them. I’m sure in a lot of cases people weren’t aware they weren’t available. The number of people who were surprised when I said it didn’t do MMS pays testament to that.

Apple shouldn’t be saying how wonderful their update is, that’s up to us as the customer to decide, they should be apologising for it taking so long to get a lot of these features in and promising that they’ll take more notice of feedback in future.

David B

Rob,

“The new APIs would be good, but… uh, what if they’re hard to use??!! Yeah, they could be hard to use!! That means the iPhone sucks!”

Is that the best you can do? The iPhone is obviously easy to develop for. You’re betting that will suddenly change?

Tom Reestman

Rob,

You’re arguing against the iPhone via a list of items culled from multiple devices as if they all existed on one device.

If you want to have this discussion, we have to start with real phones. That means stop throwing features out like I can walk into AT&T or Verizon or Sprint and buy the mythical phone being described. Give me a real phone.

You already know my chosen device: The iPhone. You know what it is now, you know what is costs now, you can actually walk in and buy one now, and you also know what’s coming (at least software-wise). Give me your phone. The RIM Storm? The HTC G1? Some LG phone, perhaps? A Windows Mobile device? Give me a real, available, tangible phone, and we can then discuss them.

Otherwise, you’re simply inventing an imaginary device against which you claim the iPhone doesn’t measure up. It’s THAT form of argument I took (and still take) exception to. Give me a phone, and we’ll compare them.

Jared

“Well done, twist what actually was said and then spout off. Not once did I say that API functionality is a bad thing. I did say that many parts of the API are greatly overdue. I also said that APIs do not necessarily provide direct benefit to consumers. First developers need to harness them. But, there is no word on how hard that might be.”

Actually they JUST SHOWED YOU MANY DEVELOPERS (EA, ESPN, Oracle, etc., etc., you did watch the presentation, right?) and what they could accomplish in two weeks. And 25,000 applications have been developed for the existing APIs so it has to be a low bar, right?

“I have not yet downloaded the new SDK for experimentation, so I cannot comment. But if they are difficult to use, they are worthless.”

The SDK has been downloaded 800,000 times and numerous developers have lauded it for how well designed and easy it is to use. I have personally developed for Palm OS and the APIs are nowhere near the iPhone APIs.

“Or GPS add-ons that enable turn-by-turn directions. And while Apple might be providing an API to make this slightly easier, some smart developer will actually have to create software to do this.”

TomTom and TeleNav already developed the iPhone turn by turn directions and was waiting for the green light and the new APIs. The App is already done it is not a question of when. When iPhone 3.0 ships this summer.

“It’s very likely that the VAST majority of those downloads are for free apps: Stanza, Pandora, Tap Tap Revenge 2, Facebook, etc. Which brings up another point: How many of those apps exist because Apple of Apple’s initial sloppiness?”

Facebook app exists because of Apple’s initial sloppiness? What? I suppose that app is built in to WinMo?

“Even Microsoft (kings of nasty underhandedness) has a healthy ecosystem of hard-ware add-ons for handhelds. ”

Wonderful pieces of technology, those WinMo devices: (quote from customer, “Huge old ugly pieces of junk”)
http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/08/08/22/iphone_3g_sales_hampered_by_windows_mobile.html

“You clearly couldn’t be bothered to read the conclusion of my first comment. I never said that Palm or Windows Mobile is brilliant or perfect, only that they have important functionality that iPhone lacks.”

True, being twice as thick as the iPhone and having three times shorter standby time (you did watch the presentation, right?) because of background apps is something the iPhone lacks.

“Put simply, Apple is playing catch-up.”

And all the other smart phones out there have 3D graphics, tilt sensors, wonderful game selection, multi-touch, easier to use browsers, etc. or if they don’t, those can be added via a software update, right?

Mike

Seriously why are you even following Paul Thurrott. He has no idea what he’s talking about yet he thinks he’s the shit. Yeah some stuff should have been there from the 1.0 release but guess what, at least they are updating it which is better than any other company has done. There has been more innovation in the cell phone industry in the last two years than there has been in the last 10 because of Apple. People need to stop following some of these so called big names in tech because they have no idea what they are talking about yet somehow they became popular.

Rob Oakes

And yet Tom, you don’t touch my points, instead you provide spin. The last time I checked, the Apple Blog was an independent source of commentary and news, not a branch of Apple PR.

You seem to take particular offense to my accusation of catch-up. Yet, I provided several important examples of where Apple is finally delivering an already existing feature. To briefly re-iterate: 1) Hardware API, 2) Copy and Paste, 3) In-Application Voice, 4) Notes sync.

And by attacking Palm instead of clarifying your own opinion, you completely miss the point. For an OS on life support, Palm successfully does things that Apple’s amazing brain child does not. Ironic, isn’t it. Why are there such glaringly obvious holes in functionality in Apple’s iPhone? Further why are you (and many other members of the media) making excuses for their existence?

“So, in your world providing hooks in your API to cool hardware and functionality for developers to take advantage of is bad. Gotcha.”

Well done, twist what actually was said and then spout off. Not once did I say that API functionality is a bad thing. I did say that many parts of the API are greatly overdue. I also said that APIs do not necessarily provide direct benefit to consumers. First developers need to harness them. But, there is no word on how hard that might be. I have not yet downloaded the new SDK for experimentation, so I cannot comment. But if they are difficult to use, they are worthless.

” Again, let me know when they catch up to the iPhone, ‘K?”

How asinine; how bout you provide coherent examples of why the other platforms are so inferior? Ya know, do something simple like provide evidence. After all, it forms the basis of most rational conversation.

I’ve already given several examples of where other platforms surpass iPhone. Here’s a few more: 1) Complete Exchange Support (iPhone only supports Calendar, E-Mail and Contacts), 2) Existing Voice Memos (iPhone 3.0 might have them, but iPhone 3.0 hasn’t shipped yet as you are so snide to point out), 3) Robust APIs so that the device can interact with other hardware. There’s the medical example from above. Or GPS add-ons that enable turn-by-turn directions. And while Apple might be providing an API to make this slightly easier, some smart developer will actually have to create software to do this. Until that occurs, it’s vaporware. 5) Windows Mobile includes a real IM client built-in, oh and it has background processes.

“Yes, and it must frustrate iPhone critics to know they can’t pull that one of their hat any more.”

Are you serious? Do you not recognize your own (incredibly ineffective) spin? It took Apple two years and a tremendous amount of whining to plug this hole. And it’s a hole which never should have existed in the first place. EVERYONE includes a clipboard, it’s been a part of nearly every operating system in existence. Thurott is right, it’s a 1.0 feature, not a 3.0 “refinement.”

“Despite the “holes” they’ve sold … 800 MILLION apps.”

Wrong. The 800 million figure represents downloads, not sales. Since Apple refuses to provide drill down data from the App store, no one knows how many sales they’ve had. It’s very likely that the VAST majority of those downloads are for free apps: Stanza, Pandora, Tap Tap Revenge 2, Facebook, etc. Which brings up another point: How many of those apps exist because Apple of Apple’s initial sloppiness?

You clearly couldn’t be bothered to read the conclusion of my first comment. I never said that Palm or Windows Mobile is brilliant or perfect, only that they have important functionality that iPhone lacks. Put simply, Apple is playing catch-up. Here are the relevant comments which address your screed: “iPhone 3.0 will be a nice improvement (if only because so many of the features plug glaringly obvious holes), but there isn’t anything exciting here … Apple can do better.”

Chris

Nice one Tom. I couldn’t have said it better.

It was a developer event. Of course it isn’t going to bowl over people who are just looking for the new fart app 2.0.

And it makes me laugh too when people are saying the iPhone is finally catching up. I guess that’s why every other phone company and Mobile OS is racing to mimic the iPhone and its success. But won’t.

Let’s at least wait until it actually comes out to start jumping out windows.

Tom Reestman

Rob,

Wow.

“As the little man at the event said, they are part of the API. Other people need to invent amazing and cool software which use them.”

So, in your world providing hooks in your API to cool hardware and functionality for developers to take advantage of is bad. Gotcha.

“And what’s worse, the features demoed are attempts to catch-up with other platforms.”

Right. Oh, and let me know when those other platforms have caught up with the iPhone. (yawn)

“As I said, Apple is playing catch-up.”

Yes, after mentioning how great Palm and Microsoft are, though the Palm OS is dead, Palm itself is on life support, and even Microsoft’s supporters think Windows Mobile is crap. Again, let me know when they catch up to the iPhone, ‘K?

“But let’s focus on the new consumer features. In a word: they suck. In most cases, Apple is playing catch up with the advertised feature sets of Windows Mobile and the Pre.”

You can’t catch up to a phone that doesn’t exist, but thanks for playing. As for WinMo, let me know when it catches up to the iPh– oh, to heck with it. You know the drill.

“Every other smart phone platform in existence shipped with [copy and paste]”

Yes, and it must frustrate iPhone critics to know they can’t pull that one of their hat any more.

“I’ve gone on far too long.”

No, no, please continue. You only mentioned a million times that the iPhone was catching up to phones that are eating its dust. I never get tired of reading that.

“iPhone 3.0 will be a nice improvement (if only because so many of the features plug glaringly obvious holes)”

And yet, as I already pointed out, despite the “holes” they’ve sold 30 million devices and 800 MILLION apps. Wow, imagine what they’ll do with “holes” plugged.

Rob Oakes

Just finished watching the event. Wow. What a disappointment. Rather than pick on the 40% of people who apparently paid attention, let’s pick on the tech journalists willing to serve as unpaid Apple PR representatives. What software event did you watch?

I might be willing to accept that Apple is providing some nice features for developers — or in most cases exposing hooks for existing features (hello iPod media library)!; but these APIs don’t provide any immediate benefits for consumers. As the little man at the event said, they are part of the API. Other people need to invent amazing and cool software which use them. Apple can’t be bothered to.

And what’s worse, the features demoed are attempts to catch-up with other platforms. Certainly one of the most interesting features, in-application voice, has been on Windows Mobile for years. Why do you think that Windows Mobile was the first to get voice chat and Mobile Skype. Yawn.

What about the API for device interfaces, surely that’s innovative? No, it’s not. In fact, it’s about bloody time that Apple decided to come to this particular party. Palm and Windows Mobile have allowed for custom device interfaces for years! There is a reason why many of those little credit card readers at the Apple store run Palm, not the iPhone OS. Even Microsoft (kings of nasty underhandedness) has a healthy ecosystem of hard-ware add-ons for handhelds. The future of medical devices, described so enthusiastically by the software engineering guy, has been here for years. In patients with pacemakers, for example, we can already download the rhythm and heart wave form data and analyze it. There are programs for both Palm and Windows Mobile which interface with the communication device. Successfully extracting telemetry data from an implanted pacemaker is amazing and innovative. Retrieving a single blood sugar measurement from a reader is absurdly ho hum (though I grant that neater stuff will probably arrive). As I said, Apple is playing catch-up.

And the push notification API sucks. Apple controls it completely. What would have been much more impressive is a generic notification API that any developer or service could use. Instead, we get more Apple lock-in. And from a technical standpoint, don’t really understand why they didn’t do it right. The iPhone 2 can receive notifications from privately owned servers, after all. Exchange, Zimbra and SMS all use it. Why not expand the device push capability to include other options as well? Instead, Apple increases my dependence on them. What happens if they decide that push-notifications is a “premium” feature at some point. Will all my push apps stop working? Apple is filled with intelligent people, they could have come up with a more intelligent way to implement push. Should their push servers go down, all notifications will die. This is concerning, since their more recent attempts at online services have generally been unimpressive.

But let’s focus on the new consumer features. In a word: they suck. In most cases, Apple is playing catch up with the advertised feature sets of Windows Mobile and the Pre. The presenter spent nearly 5 minutes demoing copy and paste. 5 minutes! Every other smart phone platform in existence shipped with this feature. The Apple implementation isn’t special, innovative or interesting. And this boring feature was one of the only points that drew applause. Sad.

What can I say about notes sync, which could have been exciting? This, without a doubt, was the the feature I was most looking forward to. And it completely blows! When Apple licensed ActiveSync from Microsoft, it included specs for over the air sync of both notes and tasks. They already have an implementation of the technology, do they use it? No. Instead, they’ve opt for a local sync (which will require iTunes. Why not include both? I’d love for my notes to be added to my Mac and also be sent to the Exchange server. That way, they appear on all my computers. That would be cool. Apple’s note sync implementation is not cool. Palm had a fully functional notes sync YEARS ago!

I’ve gone on far too long. iPhone 3.0 will be a nice improvement (if only because so many of the features plug glaringly obvious holes), but there isn’t anything exciting here. I can completely agree with those people who are now considering other options. Apple can do better.

Malachi

Truthfully…..regardless , the proof is in the pudding millions users tell the story. You can hate things about facebook, but 175 million and counting tells the true story… right, iphone is the, and its flaws, the most revolutionary mobile product of our time. All other phone companies would have been doing the same thing… I will say what holds up every US phone would be the US networks.

Stephen Antonucci

Ignore the Cretans that are NOT part of the Apple community. These naysayers will never admit they liked anything Apple does. The 17 million iPhone users show just how out of touch they are. Let’s see how many Pre phones Palm will sell offered on Sprint! Not that many I would say.

The SDK with push, and 1,000 new APIs make the iPhone a developers paradise as does the business model. I think there will be many tears shed at Palm and RIM, not to mention Microsoft in the next coming year! MMS, cut-copy-paste, stereo Bluetooth, etc that these naysayers claim should have been there, matter NOT at all, as these features will be there now!

I would ask the crackberry fans where are there apps? Ask the MS fans why does WinMo STILL suck? The iPhone is now has more apps that any other mobile platform with over 25K and with this new SDK the iPhone will continue to be the fastest growing mobile platform by far. I can’t wait for the new hardware this summer, further wiping the floor with RIM, Palm, and WinMo!

Dan

Looking forward to these features – most welcome. Some, I’m surprised Apple couldn’t do from the start but glad they’re in now. The iPhone just got hot-rodded and it’s going to be good.

Tom, Tom, Tom… where would you be without Paul Thurrott as your nemesis? You’d have to write articles that focused on something else much like you insist on Paul’s Microsoft-tunnel-vision prevents him from focusing on anything else.

You’re both predictable.

Oren Sreebny

I was really pleased to see LDAP and CalDAV support included. That will make lots more enterprise integration possible.

And I think opening up access to the iPod library is great – I hope eMusic comes up with an app for downloading direct to the phone from their service!

Mike Perry

One thing makes little sense. A 3.0 iPhone will talk to complex medical devices over Bluetooth and use the resulting data in clever ways. But it can’t pick up a single character typed on Apple’s own Bluetooth keyboard. What gives?

Is Apple as weird about keyboards on iPhones as it once was about two-button mice on Macs? If a third-party developer comes up with a Bluetooth keyboard enabled text application, will the App Store approve it?

Charles

Good insightful article. There appears to be much fascination with the Pre over at Jkontherun. We will see if the Pre actually makes it to market before Sprint implodes or Apple legal counts the intellectual capital intrusions borrowed from their 358 page multi-touch patent.

Like you, I will pick up the 3rd Gen iPhone w/OS 3.

OM

I’m curious how much space the v3.0 will take up of the iPhone.

Jasper Tandy

The clue’s in the name there. Paul Thurott looks to be a Windows evangelist. Personally, the announcement checked every box I had, so no Palm Pre for me. So excited for the release.

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