Google's Plug-In Study Finds As High As 93 MPG

5 Comments

Google’s got a handful of plug-in electric hybrids that it’s been testing on the roads for over a year now through its employee car-share program. But since many Googlers just take the cars out for a local spin, the search engine giant recently decided to complete a 7-week test of its plug-is in real world driving conditions. Now, nicely timed for the Plug-In 2008 conference this week, Google says its plug-ins “did great” and achieved as high as 93 MPG across all trips and 115 MPG for city trips.

That 90+ MPG was specifically for the plug-in Prius. The Ford Escape plug-in and the non plug-in Prius fare about half as well. See the comparison graph below to see how the contenders stacked up.

Google is already investing $10 million into its RechargeIT plug-in vehicle program, and told us recently that the company plans to make investments into green cars this summer through the plug-in program. The Google RechargeIT team also made this short video clip to explain what their 7-week drive test was all about:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cJQA3suRxMw&hl=en&fs=1]

5 Comments

jeffh

Google may be using some form of mpg equivalent for the electric only portion. As an eg. the EPA’s formula gives electric cars a reward for the economic benefits of not using gas and they show some EV’s as having mpg equivalents of up to 300 mpg.

Enote

@Tyler
exactly! the report needs to compare carbon emissions of gasoline consumed by ICE versus coal used to generate the electricity by the plug-in’s

Tyler

The MPG figures are misleading because they don’t incorporate the energy used from electricity. When I drove a plug-in for a week, I could get 400 MPG because the engine hardly ever kicked in, but obviously I used a lot of juice from the battery. There’s got to be a way to blend the electricity use and gas use to come up with an MPG-equivalent measurement. For example, you can’t use MPG with an all-electric car, so how to you compare mileage of an all-electric to that of a plug-in?

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