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Broadband Content Bits: Yahoo Rocket; Hong Kong-Olympics; Skype Videos

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Yahoo: Rocket Science Laboratories, the production company behind reality TV shows such as Temptation Island and Joe Millionaire, has signed a non-exclusive, first-look programming deal with Yahoo. The deal is likely to focus initially on creating short-form online video, with the possibility that the content could move up to a full TV or film feature. Yahoo currently has two other production deals in place Embassy Row, which is behind Yahoo’s daily series The 9, and Gotham Group, an animation company that currently has some projects in development. (Hollywood Reporter)

— NBC Universal is launching a portal with classic and current TV spots. Didja.com, built by NBCU’s USA Network, will serve as a brand portal, carrying old and new TV spots that are meant to celebrate entertaining advertising. Advertisers will be able to upload commercials to the site and establish brand pages with product offers, store locators and other sales tools, the company said. Didja.com’s debut is set for early 2008.

Olympics: Hong Kong-based telco and broadcaster I-Cable has won domestic internet and mobile rights to the 2012 London Olympics, along with standard TV rights. I-Cable will also get rights to the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, but financial terms were not disclosed. The 2008 games will be held in neighboring China. I-Cable’s 2012 package will use a “variety of platforms”. Release.

Skype: The online phone service owned by eBay has started allowing users to share videos following deals with Dailymotion and Metacafe, and the to add them into their Skype profile.

Office: The UK version of The Office is being made available for legal digital download in the US for the first time after BBC Worldwide (BBCWW) America struck distribution agreements with Netflix (for DVD) and Vuze (for downloads). Netflix will offer the series on a rental basis as a paid-for streaming and on DVD, while Vuze will sell episodes on a pay-per-view model with the first available for free.