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Industry Moves UK: Ofcom, Emap, BBC Worldwide

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Ofcom/BBC: The BBC is losing an influential innovator to media regulator Ofcom. Tom Loosemore, project director for the “BBC 2.0” series of initiatives, will lead Ofcom’s policy digital media strategy and policy, especially the developing notion of mandating a national Public Service Publisher to create online content. Since becoming head of broadband and emerging platforms, Loosemore had been involved with projects including iPlayer, iCan, search and message boards. Latterly, he had led thinking on user participation and public value. The BBC has lost several notable internet development staff in the last couple of years, including its head of innovation in May, and recently defended itself against claims it is no longer innovating sufficiently well.

Emap: The magazine publisher has poached Centaur Media digital publisher Stephen Brooks for its new digital director role in the lifestyle division. Centaur publishes magazines including New Media Age, Marketing Week and The Lawyer. Brooks is one of three hires, advertised in March, to be appointed to the lifestyle, specialist and radio consumer divisions. AOL Europe portal head Jonathan Turpin signed for radio in April, while Revolution reports the new hire to the specialist division is currently signing. Emap wants to migrate resources to faster-growth platforms like community-editorial websites. MediaWeek: Emap is looking to offload magazines including Arena, New Woman and Top Sante by touting them to rival publishers.

BBC World: Nick Meyern, an NBC Sports sales manager until joining the BBC in 1999, has been appointed to the new role of director of branded content. He was previously business development director at BBC World’s advertising sales team. This comes at a time when BBC World, the commercial news channel operated by BBC Worldwide, is trying to get more visibility in the U.S. (via DigitalSpy).