T-Mobile banning VoIP on HSDPA?

17 Comments

This actually gives credence to Verizon’s "Can you hear me now?" slogan since T-Mobile customers on the HSDPA network can’t say "Can you Skype me now?" Looks like the cellular carrier is planning strict adherence to their network do’s and don’ts. On the unacceptable list: VoIP calls and Instant Messaging. The stated penalty: risk of expulsion from the network. Sounds painful.

This coincides with T-Mobile’s HSDPA flat rate data plan called Web ‘n’ Walk Professional. Looks like you can Web, you can Walk, but you can’t Walk and Talk at the same time on the network at up to 1.8 Mbps of bandwidth speed. Ouch! I understand that the cellular carriers are looking to make money, but this is like my electric company telling me I can’t shoot an extension cord to my neighbor’s house so he can run his weed-wacker. C’mon….

-kct

17 Comments

Keith

Ooo, spam that pretends to be on topic!

Anyway, the way cellular companies judge data and voice usage is definitely going to have to change soon, all these terms of service things that disallow the exact reasons people want the services they’re offering is going to come to a head.

Michael

Its only a matter of time before we find ways around it. Whats to stop you from writing a client for your phone that creates a secure tunnel to your desktop pc which is probobally connected via a cable or dsl modem. You run the skype client on the pc,and the phone just relays the data. Lots of interesting possibilities come to mind,especially with the windows mobile devices. Once the phone becomes a portable computer,all bets are off. You might even be able to transparently tunnel all ip traffic to and from your phone to a remote server. Good luck deciding what kind of traffic your running then. If your using the phone as a modem,its even easier. Such software already exists for you. What are they going to do? Require that all traffic conform to a type that they recognize?

Michael

Its only a matter of time before we find ways around it. Whats to stop you from writing a client for your phone that creates a secure tunnel to your desktop pc which is probobally connected via a cable or dsl modem. You run the skype client on the pc,and the phone just relays the data. Lots of interesting possibilities come to mind,especially with the windows mobile devices. Once the phone becomes a portable computer,all bets are off. You might even be able to transparently tunnel all ip traffic to and from your phone to a remote server. Good luck deciding what kind of traffic your running then. If your using the phone as a modem,its even easier. Such software already exists for you. What are they going to do? Require that all traffic conform to a type that they recognize?

Vic

Looks like big business at its best, or worse depending on which side you’re on. The banning of VoIP isn’t going to stand in the way of the consumer though. I feel like T-mobile is alienating a lot of customers that are interested in VoIP. I dont see bans lasting very long.

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billy

There’s more and more competition between businesses now and days than ever before. As stated before, the last one standing will be the business who provides the features and services that other businesses cant supply or can’t afford to supply. The small businesses are shoved to the sides for their common practices in exchange for flashy looking services.

http://highspeed-internet-provider.com

Josh Einstein

Your analogy is a little off. You pay for electricity by kilowatt hour. If they had a flat rate plan I’m sure they’d not be happy about you running a cord. Just like the cable company doesn’t let you run cable to your neighbor.

BUT… cell phone companies have to get with the program. VoIP has changed the rules. I’m in telecom so I deal with alot of dummies that refuse to look forward. The fact is, you can’t charge for minutes anymore and stay in business. You have to adapt your business to sell features and other services. Minutes are a commodity and LNP makes it way too easy to ditch your carrier for someone else.

rayray

On the unacceptable list: VoIP calls and Instant Messaging. The stated penalty: risk of expulsion from the network. Sounds painful. man that sucks
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fil

Can you say poor customer service?

I can see some backlash on this policy.

Cellular wireless and 802.11 wireless are equivalent and they cannot simply impose a restriction on a specific set of services.

I can see a cable company offering WiMax in the near future and not have the same restriction.

When will phone companies learn?

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