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Summary:

Looks like a disgrunteled iTunes customer is suing Apple. According to Thomas Slattery, “Apple has unlawfully bundled, tied, and/or leveraged its monopoly in the market for the sale of legal online digital music recordings to thwart competition in the separate market for portable hard drive digital […]

Looks like a disgrunteled iTunes customer is suing Apple.

According to Thomas Slattery, “Apple has unlawfully bundled, tied, and/or leveraged its monopoly in the market for the sale of legal online digital music recordings to thwart competition in the separate market for portable hard drive digital music players, and vice-versa.”

He claims that since iTunes requires all music downloaded from it’s store to played on the iPod, a computer, or a home stereo system, that they have formed a monopoly and in turned “forced” him to purchase an iPod if we wishes to make use of the music he has payed for and downloaded.

The claim states he filed for unspecified damages for being “forced” to purchase an iPod.

  1. Hasn’t this guy ever heard of burning to a CD?

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  2. Next he’ll sue Sony because he can’t use their games on his xBox . Then Gillette because he can’t use their blades on a Schick. Then GM because he can’t use their alternator in a Ford. And, and, and.
    Totally stupid. The guy should be given a Darwin award :-)

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  3. This is great. Sure, the guy’s an idiot for not understanding the larger issue, but this is great.

    You see, this is not about the iPod, it’s about DRM. As to my knowledge (which is limited) this is the first time somebody sues over DRM.

    Could the person in question have bought a different player if Apple would license it format? Probably. Could he have played songs bought from Sony and Real and Microsoft on that player? Well, if they use the DRM formats those stores use, yes. But they need a license for that.

    Will people start suing Microsoft now because the songs they buy there can’t be put on an iPod?

    (Okay, bad anology. Apple can get a license for WMA if they want to. It’s not true the other way around.)

    DRM, baby. That’s the monopoly here. Not Apple.

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  4. (Whoah, were did the linebreaks go in my comment above??)

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  5. tractordriver88 Sunday, November 9, 2008

    What Apple is doing can be considered Anti-Trust.

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