Stories for Jul. 21, 2014

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In Brief

fios
Verizon will upgrade its fiber-to-the-home service to symmetrical broadband connections at no extra charge for customers. That means customers get the same speeds when uploading data as they do downloading data (So my colleague Kevin Tofel’s speeds up above should soon match up.) Verizon says this is because people are creating a lot more content, but it’s also smart marketing. Fiber doesn’t face the same constraints as copper or cable, so symmetrical speeds are a relatively cheap way of offering customers more value, especially customers irked about the ISP’s Netflix fight. The upgrades will be phased out in the coming months.

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Stories for Jul. 20, 2014

Mårten Mickos, CEO of Eucalyptus Systems, argues that when companies lock in to their own design and customizations, it’s as harmful as when they lock in to a vendor. Mickos explains why he thinks using standardized open source products is the best way to avoid both types of lock-in. Read more »

Stories for Jul. 19, 2014
Stories for Jul. 18, 2014
In Brief

dell chromebook open

Chromebooks in the education market are clearly picking up steam. Earlier this week, Dell said it was temporarily discontinuing direct Chromebook 11 sales to individuals because it can’t keep up with demand from commercial channels for the education-focused laptop. On Friday, Google reported one million Chromebook sales to schools in the second quarter of 2014. Along with the stat, Google published a blog post from David Andrade, the CIO for the Bridgeport Public Schools district explaining why he chose Chromebooks for the 23,000 student district in Connecticut. Among the reasons: “affordability and easy maintenance”; something we’ve suggested on the Chrome Show podcast time and time again.

Everyone complains about how social media is full of hoaxes and inaccuracies in the aftermath of a breaking-news event like the shooting down of Malaysian Flight MH17, but we all have the ability to fact-check the news. Here are some resources to do so Read more »

In Brief

HFV22_AV2

Good news for the people who have Hue lights and are sick of opening an app to turn them on. The Hue tap remote control that lets you press a button to control your Hue lights, hit the Apple store a bit ahead of schedule. The device costs $59.95 and I’m eager to try it out to see if it helps me keep my phone in my pocket. The tap is powered by pressing any one of the four buttons, which let you program four different scenes.

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