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San Francisco-based IoT startup Aether Things is delaying the shipping date of its Cone connected loudspeaker. The Cone, which is supposed to learn from your listening habits and automatically mix music based on past preferences, was scheduled to ship by July 15. On Monday, the company informed prospective buyers via email that it won’t meet that deadline: “We’ve come across some delays in finalizing Cone, which means we are unfortunately postponing the ship date. We’re very sorry to have to extend the wait,” the email reads, without providing an estimate for a new shipping date.

British blogger Brown Moses, also known as Eliot Higgins, has become a leading source of fact-checked information about military activity in Syria and elsewhere, despite having no journalistic training. And now he wants to bring those skills to others through a site called Bellingcat. Read more »

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In Brief

News that Chromecast now officially supports Android screen mirroring got a lot of people very excited this week — followed by disappointment by some who had to find out that their Android device isn’t officially supported yet. An unofficial, experimental hack just published on the XDA Developers Forum brings the functionality, which lets users beam anything happening on their phone or tablet screen to their Chromecast-equipped TV, to plenty of additional devices, including the Moto G, Moto X and the first-generation Nexus 7. However, devices have to be rooted in order to get this to work — and with anything of this nature, it’s not for the faint of heart.

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Ads from the U.K. government, charities and multinational corporations have been running ahead of jihadi recruitment videos on sites like YouTube and Dailymotion, a BBC investigation has revealed. That may mean the likes of the National Citizen Service (NCS) and Oxfam have been unwittingly putting money into the pockets of Islamist extremists, as uploaders get a cut of the ads shown before their videos. Following the investigation, NCS, Oxfam and the BBC itself – in a similar position – have complained and/or had their ads removed from the offending videos. YouTube said it removes violent extremist videos when users flag them up.

In Brief

Aereo isn’t ready to give up, and just revealed its plan B in a court filing: The company wants to get access to broadcast networks through compulsory licenses, arguing that now that the Supreme Court found it to be like a cable system, it wants to be treated as such (hat tip to the Hollywood Reporter.) That’s a stark contrast from Aereo’s previous stance, but it’s also a maneuver unlikely to succeed, as my colleague Jeff John Roberts recently explained.

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