Stories for Jul. 3, 2014
In Brief

Twitter has released an analysis of activity on the social network during the overtime shootout period in last week’s World Cup match between Brazil and Chile. The pattern, which Twitter claims has repeated itself through every overtime shootout, is pretty interesting: people tweet like crazy leading up to the kick, watch intently (and with hands off keyboards) as the player gets ready and finally kicks, and then tweet like crazy again after the kick scores or misses. Seeing this phenomenon visualized is a small window into the relationships between our eyes, fingers, televisions and computer screens during big events.

penalty_snapshot

Google is telling British media companies that it has removed articles from its index as a result of an EU decision on “the right to be forgotten.” Critics say the company is deliberately over-reacting, but it is just doing what it can to call attention to a bad law Read more »

Upcoming Events

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In Brief

After debuting its standalone Messenger app for iPhone and Android three years ago, Facebook has finally expanded the app to accommodate for the iPad. The app works more or less the same as the Messenger app currently available for the phone, including Stickers and VoIP calling. Right now, Facebook seems to be keeping chat baked into the iPad version of the Facebook app, but it will be interesting to see whether it decides to spin out Messenger and eliminate chat from the flagship app as it did for the iPhone. 

CitizenMe

The app tells users what services like Facebook can figure out about their personality and intentions. In the future, it wants to encourage people to feed that data to advertisers for cash rewards. This is an attempt to improve rather than reinvent the current internet model. Read more »

Stories for Jul. 2, 2014
In Brief

After a short 24-hour delay, NASA launched a rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California Wednesday morning, which contains a satellite and a spectrometer that will monitor carbon emissions from on high. The tool measures the colors of sunlight that bounce off of the earth — the intensity of the colors indicates how much carbon dioxide there as the light passes through the atmosphere. Check out this article for more on how cutting-edge tech in the skies is seeking answers to the world’s changing climate.

In Brief

Facebook has spent most of this week fighting off the storm of controversy from a psychology study by the company that showed it manipulated the News Feeds of thousands of users to draw an emotional response without their consent. On Wednesday, speaking to NDTV in India, COO Sheryl Sandberg admitted, “We communicated very badly.” However, Sandberg downplayed the impact of the study and said that the company was neither breaching privacy nor being manipulative: “Facebook cannot control emotions of users. Facebook will not control emotions of users.” It’s another semi-apology from Facebook: Sandberg apologized for the way the study was handled, but not for the study itself.

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