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Vine has become a popular medium for users to share six-second videos, but until now there hasn’t been a way to know how popular individual Vines are. On Tuesday, the company introduced “loop counts,” which are available now in the Vine update for iOS and Android. Loop counts are exactly that — a number in the corner of a Vine that shows how many times a video has been “looped” — or played end-to-end and restarted — since April 3. The update, which includes a redesign, also offers richer analytics for Vines, including milestones like reaching 100 “likes.”

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The web-based integration service If This Then That, which is trying to tie your physical connected devices to your digital services (and everything to each other), now supports the Nest thermostat. Or rather the Nest thermostat, which is the subject of a new open developer program, now supports IFTTT. So now readers could geo-fence their Nest to their phones, change their temps based on incoming emails (your ex sends an email the temp drops 30 degrees!) or whatever other recipes you’d like. Yes, all this will likely be available via the Nest developer program, but IFTTT is a way to bring in devices that may not yet be supported.

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QuickOffice for iOS and Android

After years of widespread use — going back to Symbian and Windows Mobile days — QuickOffice is going away as a standalone application. On its Apps blog, Google announced it will be “unpublishing” QuickOffice for both Android and iOS in the coming weeks. Google purchased QuickOffice in 2012 to integrate the Office-compatible software in Google Docs. Chromebooks have already seen some of the QuickOffice integration and once the software is pulled from app stores, you’ll only see QuickOffice in Google Docs, Sheets and Slides unless you already have QuickOffice on your mobile device: Existing app users can keep using it but the software won’t get future updates.

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Verizon now claims that its disconnecting Chromebook Pixels owners prematurely disconnected from their free 100-MB-a-month 4G plans was a mistake, and that it will work with customers to ensure that they are reconnected. A Verizon spokeswoman told TechCrunch only a small number of Pixel customers who took advantage of Verizon and Google two or three-year free data offer were affected. Since ComputerWorld first reported on the problem, Google has begun offering $150 credits for those who lost their plans. If Verizon restores their service as well, those affected customers might come out of this rather well.

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