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Last.fm, the CBS-owned digital music outlet, will close down its streaming radio product by the end of April (hat tip to Engadget). Last.fm announced in its forums Tuesday that it wants to concentrate on “scrobbling”, meaning music recognition and recommendation, going forward, and that it will rely on YouTube and Spotify for its music player. The move was widely expected after Last.fm rolled out a YouTube-based radio player in January.

Connected Car Mouse
photo: Shutterstock / Mopic

IBM is putting its data analytics to work on information collected from Peugeot’s in-car sensors, ostensibly combining it with data from traffic infrastructure and smartphones to create better car apps and more network-aware vehicles. Read more »

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In Brief

The French consumer rights group UFC-Que Chosir has sued Facebook, Google and Twitter in the Paris high court over their terms of service and data collection practices. In a statement on Tuesday, the group said the French-language terms were inaccessible and sometimes — quelle horreur! — linked to pages in English. UFC-Que Chosir is also concerned about the social networking services not seeking proper user consent before allowing others to exploit their data. The claims seem rather broad, though France does have a track record of cracking down on U.S. web firms’ privacy violations as hard as it can, so the case may turn out to have legs.

In Brief

The online food-ordering service Just Eat is planning to go public on the main London Stock Exchange or its High Growth Segment in April, the company said Monday. According to the Financial Times, the IPO should give Just Eat a valuation of between £700-£900 million ($1.16-$1.5 billion) with a planned haul of £100 million. Just Eat’s main rival is the Berlin-based Delivery Hero, which took in a whopping $88 million in Series E funding back in January. Though Just Eat was founded in Denmark, it is these days part of London’s “Tech City” hub, and its flotation would provide major validation for that scene.

In Brief

Vodafone may buy Ono, a major Spanish cable company, for around $10 billion. According to sources quoted by Reuters and Bloomberg, Ono has postponed a planned IPO announcement to allow further negotiations over the Vodafone bid. Two previous offers have been rebuffed for being too low. The British mobile carrier group is on a fixed-line acquisition spree after Verizon bought out its stake in Verizon Wireless for $130 billion — it bought Kabel Deutschland in Germany last October for $10.4 billion, and it plans to use that buy as a “hub” for further non-mobile expansion.

In Brief

Liberty Global, the largest cable company outside China and a voracious acquirer of European cable firms, is reportedly planning to launch a more mobile assault on the continent. Liberty SVP Manuel Kohnstamm told Bloomberg that John Malone’s company wants to create a “pan-European” mobile network based on mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) deals — in other words, it will resell actual network operators’ connectivity on a country-to-country basis, with the same unified billing system and back-end that supports Liberty’s fixed-line efforts. This “deep MVNO” network will begin in the U.K., the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and Austria. Kohnstamm also said Liberty was still looking out for likely acquisition targets.

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