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Dropbox is acquiring a data visualization startup called Parastructure, according to TechCrunch. It’s one of those deals where nobody is talking yet, but what little info is publicly available about Parastructure helps shed some light on Dropbox’s motivation. It’s hard to imagine Dropbox getting into the analytics software business that Parastructure was targeting, but it’s not hard to imagine Dropbox acquiring some talent that can help it scale onto, and query, new data technologies. And, like Box did with its dLoop acquisition, Dropbox might also be looking to improve search for its business users.

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In Brief

Source: SiSense

Source: SiSense

Business intelligence startup SiSense has raised a $30 million third round of venture capital from DFJ Growth, as well as existing investors Battery Ventures, Genesis Partners and Opus Capital. The company has now raised $44 million since it launched in 2010. Like most analytics startups, SiSense promises nice visualizations and a user-friendly experience, but its major bragging point is fast data processing thanks to an architecture that takes full advantage of the processor’s cache rather than just DRAM or disk. The company appears to being growing impressively, too, claiming triple-digit customer growth and some big-name accounts.

In Brief

DNA-SEQ and 1QBit, two startups working on cancer research and financial modeling, respectively, have partnered with quantum computer manufacturer D-Wave Systems to try and develop applications that can run on the latter’s system. Last month, a company called Aerospace Concepts announced its plans to develop quantum computing software targeting advanced systems design. Debate over D-Wave’s technology aside, attempts to build quantum software targeting specific industries are meaningful. If they’re eventually proven effective, such applications will presumably lower barriers to adoption (e.g., how to use them and when) that often accompany new technologies.

In Brief

DataTorrent, a startup building a stream-processing engine for Hadoop that it claims can analyze more than 1 billion data events per second, announced on Tuesday that its flagship product generally available. Stream processing is becoming more important as we move into an era of connected devices, ubiquitous sensors and fast-paced web platforms such as Twitter. Data is flowing into systems faster than ever, and many companies would like to get some use out of it in real time; in some cases, even hours-old data could be considered stale. Other products and projects addressing stream processing on Hadoop include Apache StormSpark Streaming and Samza, and Amazon Kinesis.

Hadoop software company Cloudera has acquired Gazzang, a startup specializing in encryption software for big data environments. It’s Cloudera’s first significant acquisition (it bought machine learning startup Myrrix in 2012 in more of an “acquihire” situation) and it speaks to the importance of security as customers’ […] Read more »

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