More tech Stories
On The Web

One of Russia’s top web companies, Mail.ru, said it has been fined around $15,000 for not handing over customer data to the country’s financial regulator. The regulator wanted to know who certain Mail.ru customers had been contacting during a set time period, but the web provider pointed to the Russian constitution, which protects private correspondence. Mail.ru said it will contest the fine in court.

Upcoming Events

In Brief

The chairman of the GSM Association (GSMA), the body that represents the mobile operator industry, has resigned. Franco Bernabè had been GSMA chairman since January 2011, and the body’s erstwhile deputy chairman, Telenor Group CEO Jon Fredrik Baksaas, has stepped up to be acting chairman ahead of an election next month. Bernabè’s departure was to be expected — he resigned as Telecom Italia chief at the end of September, after a strategy dispute with shareholders.

On The Web

The European Space Agency (ESA) is to start using 3D printing methods to create metal parts for rockets, jets and potentially even nuclear fusion reactors. According to the ESA, the parts will be able to withstand heat of up to 3,000° Celsius (5,432° Fahrenheit) and will cut down on materials waste. “Our ultimate aim is to print a satellite in a single piece,” said ESA new materials and energy research chief David Jarvis.

loading external resource

Lock DRM

Tim Berners-Lee suggests that allowing content protection mechanisms into the HTML5 web standard may be necessary in order to help web standards fight back against the rise of proprietary platforms. But is that tradeoff worth making? Read more »

On The Web

The United Kingdom isn’t much of a manufacturing hub these days, except for… computers? Yes, the Raspberry Pi Foundation, which makes ultra-cheap computers for educational purposes, has  built more than a million of the things in the UK over the last year (following a few months’ production in China). Some 1.75 million units have now been sold and, with partners such as Google continuing to join in the fun, the platform continues to become more useful.

On The Web

As we reported earlier this year, the UK is planning extensive trials of so-called white space connectivity – using the spectral buffer zones between TV channels in order to carry broadband and machine-to-machine communications. The regulator Ofcom has now named the 6-month trial’s participants, which range from Google and Microsoft to BT, white space radio pioneer Neul and .uk domain name registry Nominet.

18910111228page 10 of 28