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The 25,000-people-strong “class action” privacy suit against Facebook, launched in Austria at the start of this month, is going ahead. Although the case was recently shifted from one court to another, Max Schrems’s “Europe v Facebook” campaign group said on Thursday that the wheels are now properly in motion. The Vienna Regional Court has reviewed the case and ordered Facebook Ireland, the company’s international headquarters, to respond to the claimants’ accusations of widespread breaches of data protection law. The social network has four weeks to respond, though it may also apply for a four-week extension.

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Michael Halbherr has stepped down as CEO of Nokia Here, the Finnish firm’s mapping and location-based services division, after just a few months in the role. He had been with Nokia for eight years and on its leadership team for three, but he only took the Here CEO spot on 1 May this year. The team is now looking for a new chief, under the temporary leadership of Core Map Group SVP Cliff Fox. The division is currently unprofitable, but is betting on success in the connected car market in particular. According to a Wednesday statement, Halbherr quit in order to “focus once again on entrepreneurial activities.”

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In what must surely be the best advert for Tor yet, the elusive electronic music maestro Aphex Twin has announced his new album Syro — his first in 13 years — through a webpage that can only be viewed through the anonymizing network. Those who haven’t downloaded the Tor Browser can still view a similar page in a boring old non-anonymizing browser, but all they’ll get is the information about their ISP and IP address, not the track-listing nor album title. The Tor-only .onion page is part of the “Deep Web”, a below-the-surface scene of hidden services that can’t be crawled by normal search engines.

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Uber said on Monday that it is no longer banned in Berlin – for now at least. As happened in Hamburg, the company has lodged an appeal against the city’s ban, meaning the prohibition is suspended until the case is resolved. I would say that means Uber can resume services after a break of several days, but in fact the company continued operating while the ban was in force, putting itself and its drivers at risk of hefty fines. Luckily, Uber told me, no such fines were levied.

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Assange press conference

Julian Assange will “soon” leave the Ecuadorian embassy in London, where he has been taking refuge since breaking bail terms two years ago, the Wikileaks founder said Monday in a press conference. He provided no further details. Reports earlier on Monday suggested he is suffering from health issues. Assange has been hiding in the embassy since 2012, after being accused of rape and sexual coercion in Sweden a couple of years previously. The Australian fears being extradited to the U.S. over the leaking of classified military documents, via Wikileaks, by soldier Chelsea (formerly Bradley) Manning. Last year Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison over the leaks.

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Yandex on Jolla

Finnish handset maker Jolla has begun offering its Sailfish OS-based smartphone in Hong Kong through the carrier 3. This is the first notable Asian channel for Jolla — when the merry band of ex-Nokians were first developing their Meego-derived platform, they were set to have a huge distribution deal through Chinese retailer D.Phone, but that didn’t pan out. Jolla handsets, which can run Android as well as Sailfish apps, will also soon be on offer through Indian retailer Snapdeal. According to recent reports, Jolla is looking to hire former Nokia employees recently laid off by Microsoft, to support its international expansion.

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It’s kind of trendy for retailers to start accepting bitcoin. Services like Coinbase are making it easier for them to do so, and it provides good publicity, as the cryptocurrency remains outside the mainstream. But that’s not to say it’s just a stunt – Dell opened up to bitcoin payments last month, and over the weekend founder Michael Dell tweeted that someone had put in a server order for 85 bitcoin, or around $50,000. Not bad for physical servers (renting the virtual kind with bitcoin is old hat). Retailer Overstock said in March that it had taken $1 million in bitcoin payments in just two months.

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Vienna’s commercial court has decided it’s not the right place to adjudicate a massive and unprecedented class action suit over Facebook’s alleged breaking of European privacy law. As Network World reported on Friday, the court said the suit should be heard in a nearby court that deals with civil cases. Max Schrems, the man orchestrating the suit, told me this was because the case straddled the line between contract and data protection issues, and the court had merely decided the latter was more relevant than the former. “It’s a wholly administrative thing,” he said. 25,000 people have joined the suit, and another 20,000 have signed up to follow if Schrems decides it’s practical to expand the list.

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A U.K. man has been arrested for running a proxy server that granted access to “piracy” websites that had been blocked by the courts. The unnamed 20-year-old was arrested earlier this week in Nottingham, according to a Thursday statement by the City of London Police’s Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU). According to Wired, the arrested man was running Immunicity, a proxy service set up in 2013 to bypass court-ordered site blockages. As far as I’m aware, this is the first arrest in the U.K. over the circumvention of copyright-protecting measures by proxy, so it should be an interesting case to watch.

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Days after China removed foreign security vendors from its procurement lists for government departments, it has reportedly done the same with Apple products. According to anonymous sources quoted by Bloomberg, iPads and MacBooks were on a June procurement list, but not on the final version in July. Chinese state TV had previously attacked the security of iPhones — the procurement lists don’t cover smartphones, though — and everyone from Microsoft to IBM has also come in for official criticism as China and the U.S. spar over hacking and spying. That said, the procurement lists still include HP and Dell devices.

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