More tech Stories
In Brief

The fiber is barely in the ground and already Google is thinking about next generation gigabit networks, with the advertising company researching ways to get to 10Gbps on its Google Fiber networks. Its CFO Patrick Pichette spoke at an investor conference this week and noted the efforts while telling people to stay tuned about future network expansions. google’s need for speed isn’t exclusive to it. Verizon has been testing 10 Gbps using XG PON technology since 2010.

Upcoming Events

In Brief

Cisco reported financial results Wednesday and while the company saw a drop in both revenue and profits, the company is investing in the internet of things. Cisco said it has allocated $100 million to invest in early stage companies to help it move the connected world forward. The company has already said it expects the internet of everything to drive growth in its services revenue from 20 percent of total sales to 30 percent, and has announced, but not delivered an entirely new architecture for a world of connected devices speaking to the cloud.

In Brief

According to venture legend John Doerr, Google is designing its own silicon for its data centers. But he stopped short of confirming rumors that the search giant was designing ARM-based chips as was reported in December. Doerr, speaking at a chip conference, also said that Facebook would be next. He’s right. Computing is the primary cost for Google, Amazon Web Services and Facebook and designing their own silicon could lower that cost. And thanks to more modular designs and advances in the ARM architecture, the cost of designing custom chips has fallen into a range where the benefits outweigh design costs.

In Brief

Netflix updated its list of ISP rankings Monday, and the online video provider shows that Comcast and Verizon are continuing to fall in its custom rankings. That’s possibly because of peering practices put in place by those ISP’s, but the data corroborates independent data provided by testing platform Measurement Lab, which I reported on last week. Disturbingly, Netflix says the speeds delivered for Brazil, Colombia and Chile are higher than the speeds experienced by end users in the United States, which has seen its average speeds trend downward since October.

loading external resource
In Brief

Building a gigabit network is unfortunately not a fast proposition. It takes time and money to dig trenches or string fiber. But in an op-ed over at Ars Technica, the CEO of Wicked Broadband in Lawrence, Kansas suggests that if Google really wanted to drive broadband competition and gigabit networks it would teach cities how Google thinks about the problem and costs of building fiber. Then, municipalities could take on the act of building out the infrastructure and help roll out gigabit fiber faster. I’ve made a similar suggestion myself.

In Brief

Mozilla and the National Science Foundation have created a $300,000 Gigabit Community Fund, to help support people in Kansas City, Kan. and Chattanooga Tenn. create apps that will showcase novel uses for gigabit networks. The open source software developed under the program will take advantage of the advanced networks in both cities, and hopefully offer up some great use cases for people who ask, why does anyone need a gig. Last summer Mozilla provided some funding for 22 ideas that competed as part of a U.S. Ignite event to showcase gigabit apps. Check ‘em out.

In Brief

Chip licensing firm ARM shared its financial results Tuesday and it’s seeing some strong gains in the overall chip market. Its 2013 licensing revenue (from companies that pay ARM to use its chip designs) is up 32 percent year-over-year, while the overall growth of the chip industry was at 4.8 percent. So while the chip market is expanding, ARM is growing faster. However it’s growing from a much smaller base with total 2013 revenue of $1.12 billion compared to the industry’s sales of $305.58 billion. That’s a lot of chips.

In Brief

The FCC approved an order today that will let telcos experiment with shutting down their old-school analog networks in favor or running IP-based networks. As he said in an interview with me Tuesday FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler notes that these shut downs are trials and the FCC is watching them closely to ensure consumers don’t suffer. For more on the topic check out this post or this one.

In Brief

About 18 months after Google launched its Kansas City fiber-to-the-home effort the Kansas state legislature is introducing a bill to prevent other state municipalities to get involved in building their own broadband efforts — even in partnership with private companies. Several states have laws on the books that limit what municipalities can do to bring broadband connectivity, but as the need for better networks and partnerships like the one with Google or Gigabit U are gaining ground, it looks like incumbent providers are fighting back with politics.

On The Web

I thought I wrote a lot about network neutrality, but this in-depth post over at Kotaku by Comcast gadfly and game industry executive Andre Vrignaud and Public Knowledge’s Michael Weinberg tackles the threat a court’s decision to kill net neutrality poses for gamers. It also spends a good chunk of verbiage on the problems with data caps too.

In Brief

In a speech today the FCC chairman Tom Wheeler said he “intends to fight” the court ruling that on Tuesday gutted most of the FCC’s Open Internet Order governing network neutrality. Speaking at a Washington DC event he said, “Using our authority we will re-address the concepts in the open Internet order, as the court invited, to encourage growth and innovation and enforce against abuse.” So now the question is will he reclassify broadband as a Title II service or rely on the 706 clause in the Telecommunications Act? And will he do this via a formal proceeding or on a case by case basis that he had formerly preached?

On The Web

This data from CB Insights covers a huge swath of technologies from home automation products and health tracking apps to sensors and networking chip firms. So it’s no surprise that Intel is the top investor while Qualcomm and Cisco are also on the list. Check it out.

Disclosure: True Ventures is an investor in the parent company of this blog, Giga Omni Media. Om Malik, founder of Giga Omni Media, is also a venture partner at True.

12345695page 4 of 95