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Yesterday I wrote about Intel’s great big telecommunications market takeover plan, and on Wednesday the chip giant unleashed a networking chip that can offer some pretty intense competition for the network processors from the established vendors. Highland Forest is the third generation of Intel’s networking processors and can process up to 255 million packets per second. Rose Schooler, a VP and GM in Intel’s Data Center Group, says Intel currently has 17 pilots in the telecommunications space with seven of those being public today.

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It’s been a while since 1996, so Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), chairman of the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Greg Walden, chairman of the Communications Subcommittee, said Tuesday that it’s time to rewrite the Communications Act. The plan is to start generating hearings, white papers and the discussions necessary to start this process in 2015. This is a law that governs how communications infrastructure operates, and has its roots in railroad legislation from the 1800s. Since we’re moving beyond the dial-up modems of ’96 and into gigabit connections, an update makes sense. For those who want to follow the legislative action there’s a hashtag (#commsactupdate). Of course.

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Any day now the DC Circuit Court is expected to rule on Verizon’s case against the FCC’s open internet order — the network neutrality rules. Most analysts expect the court to reverse many parts of the FCC’s order, which would be a devastating blow to consumers and tech firms. But Stifel Nicolaus, a DC investment bank, notes that the expected confirmation for three new Democratic appointees to the D.C. Circuit Court will give the FCC a better chance of winning if it appeals the decision the current 3-judge panel makes. Which basically means more waiting.

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Google posted a little update on its Fiber blog noting that it’s wiring Austin for fiber over the next few months, and reminding residents to get out and ask their neighbors to sign up for the fiber service in order to get access in their neighborhood. Google notes that while it doesn’t have a date, the sign up process will take place next year. Meanwhile AT&T has already announced four neighborhoods where it will deploy fiber at 300 Mbps speeds beginning in December.

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SmartThings, the startup that offers people a hub and sensors so they can connect devices within their home, has fewer than 10,000 people using its hubs since its launch in June (one of which is mine). What’s more interesting is that those homes generate 150 million data points a day according to Jeff Hagins, the CTO of SmartThings, who shared those stats during a question and answer session on the internet of things hosted by the Federal Trade Commission. That’s a lot of data, and the FTC today is wondering what that data availability means for privacy and security.

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Under Armour has acquired MapMyFitness, an Austin, Texas-based company that uses a phone’s GPS to let people map their runs, bike rides and other workouts and share them among a community for $150 million. It’s akin to the RunKeeper app. Is this the beginning of consolidation in the quantified self arena? Will the market split along sporty and medical lines — leaving room for authentication, provable algorithms and other elements a diagnostic style app or activity tracker might need?

Updated to reflect that RunKeeper is not owned by Nike.

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