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Stories for Apr. 16, 2014
In Brief

Music subscription service Spotify is getting ready to switch its data delivery technology from P2P to a server-client model, according to a TorrentFreak report. Spotify has long been using P2P for its desktop client, but not for mobile and web listening, and it makes sense that the company is looking to streamline its data delivery as mobile usage grows and bandwidth prices continue to decline. With the shift, Spotify is also closing the book on a little-known part of its past: uTorrent creator Ludvig Strigeus started working for Spotify after he sold his company to BitTorrent Inc. That sale was facilitated by none other than Spotify CEO Daniel Ek, who briefly served as uTorrent’s CEO.

In Brief

Jasper Wireless has quietly become a force in the internet of things, brokering and managing many of the connectivity agreements – including AT&T’s increasing number of connected car partnerships – that link appliances, gadgets and vehicles to mobile networks. On Wednesday, Jasper announced it has raised a $50 million round led by the government of Singapore’s investment arm Temasek Holdings, and according to the Wall Street Journal, the funding raises its valuation to $1 billion. Mobile connectivity has mainly been a big factor in the industrial internet of things, where shipping, trucking and many other industries have long used machine-to-machine connectivity. But Jasper’s M2M technology is gradually creeping into the consumer realm, in particular the connected car.

 

In Brief

U.S. Sen. Al Franken has written to Netflix asking its opinion on Comcast’s efforts to buy Time Warner Cable, implying that Netflix is a good indicator of the potential consumer and content harms of the deal. In his letter, Franken touches on peering challenge, noting that Comcast implied that it was no big thing in its hearing before the Senate Judiciary committee. Since Netflix wasn’t at the hearing, perhaps Sen. Franken just wants to get Netflix’s comments on the record. And while, we aren’t Netflix, if Sen. Franken is interested, here’s how we think regulators should view the deal.