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photo: Microsoft

Since Microsoft bought Nokia’s hardware division, the company is in the non-smartphone market whether it likes it or not. To that end, Microsoft announced the Nokia 130 on Monday: A basic €19 ($25.43 US) handset aimed at music listeners and video watchers. The candybar styled handset runs Nokia OS and can pump out tunes for a whopping 46 hours on a single charge; there’s definitely a battery life benefit to not running a complex mobile OS or having to power a multitude of sensors. As you’d expect at this price, hardware is minimal: You’ll be watching videos on a 1.8” color screen, for example.

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In Brief

ipod touch v iphone 6

How much more power will the battery have in Apple’s iPhone 6? About 45 percent more capacity than the power pack in the iPhone 5s suggests analyst Sung Chang Xu, who expects a 2100 mAh battery in Apple’s next phone notes GforGames. This rumor contradicts earlier reports of an 1810 mAh battery in the phone that’s expected to debut at a reported September 9 Apple press event. Considering I’m not familiar with this particular analyst — nor her supply chain sources — I’m not betting money on the 2100 mAh figure just yet. I’m also wondering if the battery capacity is actually for a larger, 5.5-inch edition of the iPhone 6. Either way, don’t equate 45 percent capacity with 45 percent more run-time on a charge: It’s going to take more power to light those pixels on a bigger screen.

In Brief

hp slatebook 14 open

Can the market support a notebook computer that runs a mobile operating system? That’s the question HP is attempting to answer with its SlateBook, a 14-inch laptop powered by Google Android software. The SlateBook 14 was announced in June with a July 20 launch but the computer is only shipping just now notes Android Headlines. The $430 cost gets you hardware similar to a less pricey Chromebook. There is an advantage to running Android instead of Google’s ChromeOS though: Hundreds of thousands of available apps. Is that enough to bring mass appeal? I don’t think so, but HP will surely find a niche audience with this product.

In Brief

chromebook with kids
photo: Google

My $1,449 Chromebook Pixel just got a little more useful and so did the $299 Acer Chromebook C720P. The latest Stable channel software update adds support for pinch-to-zoom in Chrome OS. That means any touchscreen Chromebook now has the feature. Previously, pinch-to-zoom was available on developer and beta channels, but the user had to enable the feature in a hidden setting. Now, it’s on by default and makes the overall browsing experience a little better. This function, along with the recent addition of handwriting recognition could make for a nice Chrome OS tablet, particularly if it came with a docking keyboard, no?

In Brief

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Not that we needed yet another data-point explaining why China is such an important mobile market or anything but Reuters is happy to provide one. On Monday, it reported that for the first time ever, more people in China access the web on a mobile device as opposed to a PC. The data comes from the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) and says that of the 632 million internet users in China, 83 percent (527 million) used a phone or tablet to do so. That compares with 81 percent of the connected population accessing the web through a PC, with some overlap between the two of course.

In Brief

dell chromebook open

Chromebooks in the education market are clearly picking up steam. Earlier this week, Dell said it was temporarily discontinuing direct Chromebook 11 sales to individuals because it can’t keep up with demand from commercial channels for the education-focused laptop. On Friday, Google reported one million Chromebook sales to schools in the second quarter of 2014. Along with the stat, Google published a blog post from David Andrade, the CIO for the Bridgeport Public Schools district explaining why he chose Chromebooks for the 23,000 student district in Connecticut. Among the reasons: “affordability and easy maintenance”; something we’ve suggested on the Chrome Show podcast time and time again.

In Brief

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Amid 18,000 job cuts and the elimination of Android-powered handsets, Microsoft is also putting two other Nokia product-lines out to pasture. The Verge received an internal memo written by Microsoft’s Jo Harlow, who leads the new Smart Devices and Mobile Phones group, with the news: Nokia’s Series 40 and Asha handsets will be no more, with both products joining the Nokia X Android phone in an 18-month maintenance mode. That means the low-cost handset market will become more important for Windows Phone as that’s where these products are aimed: $50 or less. The company isn’t out of top-drawer handset ideas though: The memo says to watch for “other high-end products that we will be announcing very soon.”

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