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Comcast  is preparing to launch its cloud DVR in the Boston market “very soon,” according to a FierceCable report. The company’s SVP and GM of Video Services Matt Strauss told FierceCbale that the new network DVR, which will store customers’ recordings in the cloud, will be rolled out market by market this year. The cloud DVR will only be made available to subscribers who also have Comcast’s new X1 set-top box, which was also rolled out in Boston first.

In Brief

Los Angeles-based music marketing and merchandise sales startup Topspin Media laid of a significant number of its staff Wednesday. Music blog hypebot first reported the news, calling it “major layoffs,” and laid off employees said on Twitter that “half“or even “the majority” of the company’s staff was let go. Topspin acknowledged that there have been layoffs when contacted by Gigaom, but declined to comment further on the matter. The company recently teamed up with Spotify to offer artists a way to directly sell merchandise through its service, and it is also slated to power a similar integration for the recently-launched Beats Music service.

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On The Web

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings recently said that it wants to do away from the one-price-fits-all model and introduce three pricing tiers for new members. Why three? The Atlantic looks at the behavioral psychology of pricing, and explains why the Goldilocks effect is always making us go for the middle tier, regardless of how expensive it is.

On The Web

Netflix is trying to lock down content rights ahead of its planned expansion to Europe later this year, according to the Wall Street Journal. The paper is reporting, as we did just last week, that Netflix is eyeing Germany and France in particular – but there are some hurdles with regards to regulations in France, and a bunch of competitors already in place in Germany.

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On The Web

Pioneering digital music site Last.fm just launched a radio product powered by YouTube videos that will help to keep the music streaming, without adding to Last.fm’s music licensing bill, according to hypebot. Last.fm was one of the first sites to analyze listeners’ music collections and generate personalized radio streams, but the site has been on a steady decline ever since CBS bought it for $280 million in 2007.

On The Web

TiVo is laid off most of its industrial designers, according to a Wired report, which initially speculated that this may be part of a bigger strategy shift that would result in TiVo exiting the hardware business. TiVo has since assured me that the company will continue to make hardware, and in fact has plans for future retail products. Of course, TiVo has seen most of its growth coming from its operator business for some time, but last year, it nonetheless revamped its entire hardware line. This story was updated on 1/23 with additional information made available by TiVo.

On The Web

Gradual copyright enforcement legislation, also known as three-strikes laws, don’t curb piracy: That’s the result of a new study that looked at the effectiveness of France’s anti-piracy legislation, which fines and disconnects users after repeat warnings. Researchers found, according to Torrentfreak, that this simply results in users getting smarter about piracy, shifting from monitored file sharing networks to other sources for unlicensed downloads.

In Brief

The developer of Freevo, a pioneering media center app for Linux, Windows and OS X, announced that the app won’t receive any future updates. Freevo, which was first released in 2002, combined DVR and media playback capabilities for home theater PCs. Freevo’s developer wrote Monday on a mailing list that Freevo has been surpassed by other technologies including the media center competitor XBMC and Google’s Chromecast.

In Brief

Updated. The iPhone app for Beats Music, the much-anticipated music subscription service that is spearheaded by Jimmy Iovine, went live in Apple’s iTunes app store  ahead of its official launch Tuesday morning. Beats will also be available on Android, but the app can’t be found on Google Play yet – and we just got words from Beats that the version on the app store (1.0.0) isn’t actually the final launch version, so installing may not get you very far. Beats has a big focus on mobile; new users that want to take advantage of the services 7-day free trial need to go through an onboarding process that is only available through its mobile apps. A sign-up page with links to the apps is also already available online. This post was updated at 9:12pm with more information on the iOS app.

In Brief

The team behind the open source video player VLC released an updated iOS version through the iTunes app store on Monday that brings an iOS 7-optimized look to the app. The new version 2.2 also includes a number of new features, including support for streaming media directly from Dropbox or Google Drive, multi-touch gestures and improved UPnP support, which should make the app a better companion for network-attached storage drives. As always, VLC is free and ad-free.

On The Web

It’s true: Digg is doing original content, and one of its first pieces is a great long-form read titled “Is this thing on?” The article has radio journalist Stan Alcorn wondering why there are tons of viral videos on the internet, but rarely any viral audio stories. Alcorn found one great exception from that rule, but it’s not a podcast — and it may be hard to replicate. A must read for everyone interested in the future of radio, podcasts and online storytelling.

In Brief

Rdio is now letting U.S. listeners use its music subscription service for free — on the web, anyway: The music service announced Thursday that it is allowing users to listen as much as they want on its website. Rdio is monetizing the new free offering through ads, which are sold by its new partner Cumulus. Ad-free listening still costs $10 a month. The announcement comes a day after Spotify announced that it is removing limits to free listening in all of its territories, and less than a week before Beats Music launches its service in the U.S.

In Brief

Google brought its Google Play Movies and TV app to iOS Wednesday, making it easier for users of the service to watch rented and bought videos on their iPad or iPhone. The app also includes Chromecast support, making it possible to beam titles to Chromecast-equipped TV screens. However, there’s one thing amiss: Users won’t actually be able to rent or buy any movies or TV shows through the app — Google apparently wasn’t willing to send Apple checks for its 30 percent cut on in-app purchases.

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