More tech Stories
On The Web

Engadget has some interesting details about the next Google TV device coming from Sony: After the company tried everything from integrating the platform into TV sets to Blu-ray players to standalone boxes, it’s now going down the Chromecast route and putting the whole system on a dongle. Except, this one will offer HDMI pass-through for live TV access as well. No word yet when the device will officially be unveiled.

Upcoming Events

On The Web

New York-based direct film distribution platform VHX has raised $3.2 million in funding from Union Square Ventures, William Morris Endeavor and existing investors, reports AllThingsD. The company offers Louis CK-like direct distribution for film makers and standup comedians alike, and its biggest get so far was Aziz Ansari’s comedy special Dangerously Delicious. VHX generated $2 million in revenue last year, and raised $1.25 million in seed funding in June of 2012.

loading external resource
On The Web

Love binge watching Netflix shows like Orange is the New Black and House of Cards? Then you have to thank this guy: The L.A. Times has a great profile of Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos, who started out as a video store clerk and now has Hollywood all abuzz about releasing entire seasons of a show at once, and refusing to give out ratings. Best choice quote from House of Cards director David Fincher: “When somebody offers you exactly what you’re asking for, be smart enough to say ‘yes.’”

On The Web

Variety’s Andrew Wallenstein stumbled across an interesting tidbit in Netflix’s recent 10-Q filing: The company is saying that it may be seeing “higher than initially expected” binge viewing activity for Netflix originals like House of Cards and Orange is the New Black. Why would it be a bad thing if its shows were really popular, you may ask? Because the money spent on this type of content would amortize faster than planned, and Netflix would eventually have to spend even more on content to keep its subscribers watching.

On The Web

“I cannot describe to you the frustration I feel at the way these negotiations have gone. Never in my most pessimistic moments did I ever think that they would have lasted this long and have been so difficult.”

CBS CEO  Les Moonves in a memo to his staff about the ongoing retrans fight with Time Warner Cable.

In Brief

Just hours after releasing its new Android app, YouTube is following up with a new iOS app that brings most of the new features to iPads and iPhones as well. This includes the ability to scour for new videos while you’re watching one, with a kind of picture-in-picture mode, as well as advanced preview capabilities for Chromecast and other DIAL-capable devices. Check out all the details on YouTube’s blog, or download the app via iTunes.

In Brief

Streaming locally stored videos and music with Google’s Chromecast streaming stick just got a lot easier: Android hacker Koushik Dutta released an app this weekend that streams any video from your phone’s gallery, Google Drive or Dropbox to a Chromecast device within the same network. And the best thing: It’s not based on Google’s SDK, so you don’t need to jump through extra hoops to make it work. Check out a video of it here, and download the latest release of the Android app here.

In Brief

Just when you thought that those enterprising third-party Chromecast developers have tried everything, they’re taking it one step further: Leon Nicholls, who previously experimented with local content playback, online shopping and other cool stuff on Chromecast, has managed to hook up his Kinect to a web app running on Google’s new TV stick. The result is a video playing via Chromecast that can be controlled with simple gestures, and us wondering what folks like Nicholls come up with next.

On The Web

Adap.tv, the ad exchange that AOL agreed to buy for $405 million last week, may have a problem with ads running on bogus sites where they are viewed only by bots, according to an Adweek report that quotes multiple researchers and ad buyers, some of which deemed between 30 and 80 percent of Adap.tv’s ad impressions suspicious. The company denies any wrongdoing, but it may just be part of a bigger problem in an industry where hidden ads are standard practice.

On The Web

A number of companies including Apple, Intel, Sony and Google have reportedly been trying to secure rights to build an online pay TV offering, and now we’ve got news about the first brokered deal. Sony struck a preliminary agreement to stream Viacom’s TV stations online as part of its still-unannounced TV service, the Wall Street Journal is reporting today. Expect more of those deals to become public over the coming months.

In Brief

ESPN is opening up streaming of the ESPN3 feed on its WatchESPN iOS app to college students and military personnel that use an on-campus or on-base Wifi network. The cable network, which previously only served up live streams on iOS to pay TV customers,  is slated to announce the change as part of the relaunch of its iPad app Thursday. The new app comes with a revamped UI and a number of new features, including the ability to watch a live stream and an archived video at the same time – because, what else is there to do in a dorm room, right?

(Updated at 7:50am to clarify that this only covers ESPN3 live streaming.)

1161718192067page 18 of 67

You're subscribed! If you like, you can update your settings