More tech Stories
On The Web

Direct-to-fan music distribution service CD Baby has paid its musicians more that $300 million since it first opened shop in 1997, according to a post on Hypebot.com. CD Baby began as a CD mail-order service for indie musicians, but has since expanded into digital distribution as well. The company expects to pay musicians $60 million this year alone, which goes to show that some folks are actually making money with digital music, after all.

Upcoming Events

On The Web

Hulu has long insisted that it is less like Netflix and more like cable, giving viewers the option to watch current shows, but also showing them ads, even if they pay for the company’s Hulu Plus subscription service. But the company may be introducing an ad-free tier in the future: Hulu’s interim CEO Andy Forssell said at a Goldman Sachs conference this week that Hulu may give viewers an option to pay more for an ad-free experience, according to a Variety report. How much more are we talking? According to the report, Hulu generates about $7 of ad revenue for every Hulu PLus subscriber.

loading external resource
In Brief

The popular open source video player app VLC got a significant update Wednesday: VLC 2.1 features support for 4K video, completely revamped audio playback and video hardware decoding, which should make video playback especially on mobile devices a lot smoother. Speaking of which: The new version also comes with new apps for OS X and Android, as well as a partial Windows 8 and WinRT port for all those folks out there who don’t know what else to do with their Surface RT.

In Brief

US-based news junkies can once again access reports produced by Quatar-based Al Jazeera English online after the network stopped blocking access to its YouTube videos from within the US Tuesday. Al Jazeera started to lock out U.S. viewers from its online videos when it launched its new cable channel Al Jazeera America back in August due to contractual obligations. Its contracts with cable operators also forced the network to block its live stream in the US, which remained inaccessible Tuesday. It’s unclear what exactly changed with regards to its YouTube videos, but Al Jazeera English staff celebrated the move online:

On The Web

Prepare for the next TV blackout: Dish and Disney are currently in negotiations about their next deal, and the Hollywood Reporter is reminding us that their deadline coming up at the end of the month. After that, blackouts are possible. But could Dish go nuclear and drop Disney’s ESPN network? Most people don’t think so, but Dish boss Charlie Ergen recently said that it may be time to take that step.

On The Web

Pakistan started banning access to YouTube a year ago as a response to violent protests against clips of the anti-Islamic film The Innocence of Muslims, and the company has kept up the ban ever since. Now, democracy activists are arguing that the Pakistani government uses those clips as a pretext to suppress freedom of speech. The Christian Science Monitor has an interesting look at Pakistan’s YouTube ban and some of its unintended consequences.

In Brief

Now this is an interesting move (excuse the pun): SoundCloud has hired Muve Music founder and ex-SVP Jeff Toig as its new Chief Business Officer. Toig not only founded the music subscription service Muve on behalf of its corporate parent Cricket Wireless, but also turned it into a big success story by rolling the cost of music subscriptions into Cricket’s data plans. At SoundCloud, he is likely going to use his music biz contacts to build some new revenue opportunities for the company.

On The Web

Microsoft wants to make a lot more exclusive programming for Xbox Live: The company’s Los Angeles-based production team is busy incubating “hundreds of ideas” for new TV shows, Microsoft Studios VP Phil Spencer told Bloomberg. Microsoft is currently producing a live-action Halo show, and plans to make announcements about additional shows in the coming months.

On The Web

Twitter is working on a redesigned iOS experience that will put a much bigger focus on media consumption, according to a report filed by AllThingsD’s Mike Isaac. The new app will come with a dedicated column for photos shared through the service, and possibly also do the same for TV-related tweets and videos. This makes a lot of sense for the company: Twitter has been working a lot behind the scenes to integrate with TV, and TV ad dollars will play a big role in Twitter’s upcoming IP.

1151617181968page 17 of 68

You're subscribed! If you like, you can update your settings